Control & Automation

Video Doorbells Get Ugly: SkyBell Slams Ring in Patent Infringement Lawsuit

In patent-infringement case, SkyBell says Ring (Bot Home Automation) competes on hype, not innovation. Meanwhile, Ring says Nest is a copycat.

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4 Comments
Posted by jonsmirl on January 7, 2018

9055202—Not a new invention, that is the technique used to make pet friendly motion detectors and it has been in the market over 30 years.
9179109 —Not a new invention, billions of devices use remote signaling to exit sleep mode. Your cell phone does it every time it rings.
9179107—Can you say cell phone “ring tones”?

All of these patents, including the next group, are nothing more than well know techniques with the word “doorbell” substituted. None of them should have been granted.  None of them are looking at the prior art from military secure entry systems which have all of these things. All of these patents need to head straight to inter partes review.

There is nothing new in these any of these doorbells. Every feature I have ever seen in a doorbell already exists somewhere else. All that has happened is that the cost of components has dropped low enough now to make video doorbells affordable for consumers in addition to high security buildings.

Posted by nicholsjh on January 8, 2018

If R&D trumped marketing & distribution, we’d all be using Commodore computers today.  This looks a lot like the use of patent & legal submissions to drum up “free” media, and to hope it draws them some sales & additional capital funding.  I read this as desperation by SkyBell, and I have no dog in this fight whatsoever.  It just makes me a bit leery of their products.

Posted by jonsmirl on January 8, 2018

This one makes me laugh, but it will cause a bunch of wasteful litigation….

Automatic sensing of individual approaching door—The receiving device within the proximity of a door has a sensor to detect approaching individuals and cause an action to occur within the system. (Patent #7193644, claim 1)

Nobody noticed the automatic doors every time you go to Home Depot or the grocery store? Those were invented in the 1950’s.

Posted by Blefadts on January 10, 2018

Marketing is a better way to bring a product to market, lawsuit is frivolous

4 Comments
Posted by Blefadts on January 10, 2018

Marketing is a better way to bring a product to market, lawsuit is frivolous

Posted by jonsmirl on January 8, 2018

This one makes me laugh, but it will cause a bunch of wasteful litigation….

Automatic sensing of individual approaching door—The receiving device within the proximity of a door has a sensor to detect approaching individuals and cause an action to occur within the system. (Patent #7193644, claim 1)

Nobody noticed the automatic doors every time you go to Home Depot or the grocery store? Those were invented in the 1950’s.

Posted by nicholsjh on January 8, 2018

If R&D trumped marketing & distribution, we’d all be using Commodore computers today.  This looks a lot like the use of patent & legal submissions to drum up “free” media, and to hope it draws them some sales & additional capital funding.  I read this as desperation by SkyBell, and I have no dog in this fight whatsoever.  It just makes me a bit leery of their products.

Posted by jonsmirl on January 7, 2018

9055202—Not a new invention, that is the technique used to make pet friendly motion detectors and it has been in the market over 30 years.
9179109 —Not a new invention, billions of devices use remote signaling to exit sleep mode. Your cell phone does it every time it rings.
9179107—Can you say cell phone “ring tones”?

All of these patents, including the next group, are nothing more than well know techniques with the word “doorbell” substituted. None of them should have been granted.  None of them are looking at the prior art from military secure entry systems which have all of these things. All of these patents need to head straight to inter partes review.

There is nothing new in these any of these doorbells. Every feature I have ever seen in a doorbell already exists somewhere else. All that has happened is that the cost of components has dropped low enough now to make video doorbells affordable for consumers in addition to high security buildings.