Home Theater

Custom-made James Loudspeaker Soundbar ‘Rocks’ in Large Stone Wall Project

James Loudspeaker works with Orlando integration company A/V Creative Concepts for challenging installation that required unique custom speaker in a giant shallow-depth stone wall.

Custom-made James Loudspeaker Soundbar ‘Rocks’ in Large Stone Wall Project
Meeting a Florida homeowner's need for a specific speaker solution, James Loudspeaker engineered its SPL4QLCR loudspeaker for a client of integration company A/V Creative Concepts.

Robert Archer · May 15, 2018

A recent challenging project faced by Orlando-based integrator A/V Creative Concepts proves nothing is "set in stone" when it comes to creating an imaginative design to meet the client's needs. Indeed, on this project, the only thing "set in stone" was the custom-created James Loudspeaker soundbar that had to be embedded in a giant stone wall and designed to match the home's pervasive use of marble. 

To meet the client's demands, A/V Concepts' principal David Athey consulted with a stone contractor to formulate a plan to design the homeowner's audio system, which he intended to complement the home's use of marble throughout the property.

Athey shipped a sample of the marble brick and flooring to James Loudspeaker's Napa, Calif.-based facilities, and James was able to create a custom finish that would match the looks of the home's stone appointments. 

As part of his design, Athey also determined the best way to address the homeowner's performance aspirations. The system needed a customized left/center/right three-channel soundbar to reside in a shallow void in the home's brickwork. 

A/V Concepts, James Create Custom Subs 

Ultimately, Athey decided to use James' SPL4QLCR soundbar. The SPL4QLCR is a shallow-depth, three-channel soundbar that incorporates three of the company's quad-tweeter arrays, along with six 4-inch woofers. 

"Though more pricey than plastic big-box speakers, having the ability to satisfy the client by delivering high-performance speakers that fit each room perfectly gives me quite an advantage over competing A/V integrators," notes Athey. 

The mason had to create a plastic tent
to protect the stone dust from entering
the rest of the home.

The 3-inch deep soundbar fit into the stonework so tightly that the mason had to shave the surrounding stone, which required the mason to create a tent of protective plastic around the area to keep the stone dust from permeating the home. 

Aesthetically, the client asked A/V Creative Concepts for a silver finish, and James' Light Titanium finish fit the bill perfectly. 

Athey found a happy middle-ground between maintaining the home's interior design, and a full, visceral home theater experience by using a custom subwoofer.

To create the custom sub, James Loudspeaker's engineers examined the dimensions of the space and surroundings, and they designed a variation of the company's EMB-10DF subwoofer. 

The sub and its companion outboard amplifier deliver bass without disrupting the room's aesthetics via a combination of an aluminum enclosure (finished in a powder coat to match the floor tiles), and the sub's Energy Multiplied Bandpass technology. 

Related: James Loudspeaker 42SA-4 Small Aperture Speaker Fits into Shallow Walls and Ceilings

A/V Creative Concepts' design called for a home theater system that could reproduce object-based surround sound, so Athey opted for James Loudspeaker's SXC420 in-ceiling speakers.

The SXC420's enclosures are made with aircraft-grade aluminum, and James backs the speakers with a choice of round or square grilles, along with custom paint colors to help the speakers blend in with the marble-studded room. 

A/V Concepts Adds Whole-House Audio System

A/V Concepts also installed a Denon HEOS whole-house audio system, featuring James loudspeakers, as well as an RTI-based control system, and SnapAV's Luma brand of security cameras. 

In addition, a UPS backup system was installed to protect the electronics, which also includes a home network.

"In Florida, it is not uncommon to have power outages for a few minutes or a few hours. For the shorter events, the UPS prevents annoying reboots of cable boxes, gateway modems, etc., for the client. I also go as far as having TV power loop back to the UPS in the rack to avoid sudden outages and giving the owner enough time to close sensitive components like projectors or RAID servers down properly," comments Athey. 

"The system looks and sounds fantastic, and no off-the-shelf loudspeaker array could have achieved the same end result. The client is thrilled with their theater and very pleased with the design and installation services that my company provided. James Loudspeaker helped me achieve that goal," he adds. 



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  About the Author

Bob is an audio enthusiast who has written about consumer electronics for various publications within Massachusetts before joining the staff of CE Pro in 2000. Bob is THX Level I certified, and he's also taken classes from the Imaging Science Foundation (ISF) and Home Acoustics Alliance (HAA). Bob also serves as the technology editor for CE Pro's sister publication Commercial Integrator. In addition, he's studied guitar and music theory at Sarrin Music Studios in Wakefield, Mass., and he also studies Kyokushin karate at 5 Dragons in Haverhill, Mass. Have a suggestion or a topic you want to read more about? Email Robert at rarcher@ehpub.com

Follow Robert on social media:
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View Robert Archer's complete profile.



  Article Topics


Home Theater · Speakers · Loudspeakers · Architectural · In-Ceiling/In-Wall · Audio/Video · Distributed Audio · News · Projects · Denon · HEOS · James Loudspeaker · RTI · Soundbar · All Topics
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Comments

Posted by jrbishop on May 15, 2018

Hi Bob,
Thanks for a cool overview of a cool system!
I reviewed this project when I first joined the James Loudspeaker Company as Director Architectural Audio Services in February of this year; (a consultancy for training, content, and general messaging endeavors). What I liked about it most was the cinema grade sound quality deployed in a very cool media room space. The Quad Tweeter Array used in the front LCR stage delivers cinema output levels with an audiophile sound performance. That is the secret weapon of all the JLS models typically used in cinema and high-end music spaces. Of course, the custom configured JLS designs are especially evident in this job. We just make if work, make it fit, and make it beautiful; all in welded aircraft grade aluminum.

Since looking at this system I developed a range of pre-engineered ‘Mavericks Architectural Cinema’ sound systems for 5 standardized room sizes from 1500 cu’ to 24,000 cu’, all using the QTA HF transducers like the ones featured in this job. We defined the spaces in footprint and front elevation, and included imaging system recommendations; screen size, format, masking design, & recommended seating layout. I added a 6th space, the Architectural Media Room, inspired by this system which has an open space but a very nicely executed immersive audio sphere. My pre-engineered systems are in the 7.4.4 architecture for simplicity, and it has been test launched within 5 joint James Loudspeaker and AudioControl territories to start. Ultimately, I’ve outlined electronics packages from Trinnov & DataSat to ACURUS & McIntosh in 7.4.6 configuration where possible, about 10 electronics brands in total are on the spread sheet.

For those interested I’m giving a class at CEDIA Expo in San Diego titled ‘Architectural Cinema’, where the performance criteria for the audio and video aspects of a genuine cinema based residential design is discussed. CEDIA members can go to the CEDIA Community blog where I just posted a synopsis under a Murray Kunis thread ‘Larger than 100”.  I helped answer his question on DLED imaging tech along with other imaging issues, and the topic came up.
Thanks again Bob, see you around pike.
Cheers,

Posted by jrbishop on May 15, 2018

Hi Bob,
Thanks for a cool overview of a cool system!
I reviewed this project when I first joined the James Loudspeaker Company as Director Architectural Audio Services in February of this year; (a consultancy for training, content, and general messaging endeavors). What I liked about it most was the cinema grade sound quality deployed in a very cool media room space. The Quad Tweeter Array used in the front LCR stage delivers cinema output levels with an audiophile sound performance. That is the secret weapon of all the JLS models typically used in cinema and high-end music spaces. Of course, the custom configured JLS designs are especially evident in this job. We just make if work, make it fit, and make it beautiful; all in welded aircraft grade aluminum.

Since looking at this system I developed a range of pre-engineered ‘Mavericks Architectural Cinema’ sound systems for 5 standardized room sizes from 1500 cu’ to 24,000 cu’, all using the QTA HF transducers like the ones featured in this job. We defined the spaces in footprint and front elevation, and included imaging system recommendations; screen size, format, masking design, & recommended seating layout. I added a 6th space, the Architectural Media Room, inspired by this system which has an open space but a very nicely executed immersive audio sphere. My pre-engineered systems are in the 7.4.4 architecture for simplicity, and it has been test launched within 5 joint James Loudspeaker and AudioControl territories to start. Ultimately, I’ve outlined electronics packages from Trinnov & DataSat to ACURUS & McIntosh in 7.4.6 configuration where possible, about 10 electronics brands in total are on the spread sheet.

For those interested I’m giving a class at CEDIA Expo in San Diego titled ‘Architectural Cinema’, where the performance criteria for the audio and video aspects of a genuine cinema based residential design is discussed. CEDIA members can go to the CEDIA Community blog where I just posted a synopsis under a Murray Kunis thread ‘Larger than 100”.  I helped answer his question on DLED imaging tech along with other imaging issues, and the topic came up.
Thanks again Bob, see you around pike.
Cheers,

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