Bluetooth Special Interest Group Announces Next-Generation Format

The new Bluetooth LE format will include a number of new features such as multi-stream capabilities and broadcast audio sharing.

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The Bluetooth Special Interest Group (SIG) has announced the upcoming release of LE Audio, the next generation of Bluetooth audio.

According to this electronics industry association, not only will LE Audio enhance Bluetooth audio performance, it will add support for hearing aids and enable “Audio Sharing,” an entirely new use case that is poised to once again transform the way we experience audio and connect with the world around us.

“With close to one billion Bluetooth audio products shipped last year, wireless audio is the largest Bluetooth market,” says Mark Powell, CEO of the Bluetooth SIG.

“The launch of LE Audio is a prime example of how the Bluetooth community is driving technology and product innovation and enabling delivery of even better and more capable Bluetooth audio products.”

Bluetooth LE Designed for Diverse Applications

Following the announcement of the Bluetooth LE format, the Bluetooth organization says its new audio format will soon support two operation modes: LE Audio will operate on the Bluetooth Low Energy (LE) radio while Classic Audio operates on the Bluetooth Classic radio (BR/EDR). LE Audio will support the development of the same audio products and use cases as Classic Audio, while introducing new features to improve their performance.

Here is a closer look at some of Bluetooth LE’s features:

Low Complexity Communication Codec (LC3) for Higher Quality and Lower Power

LE Audio will include a new high-quality, low-power audio codec. Providing high quality even at low data rates, LC3 will provide flexibility to developers, allowing them to make better design tradeoffs between key product attributes such as audio quality and power consumption.

“Extensive listening tests have shown that LC3 will provide improvements in audio quality over the SBC codec included with Classic Audio, even at a 50% lower bit rate,” notes Manfred Lutzky, head of audio for communications at Fraunhofer IIS.

“Developers will be able to leverage this power savings to create products that can provide longer battery life or, in cases where current battery life is enough, reduce the form factor by using a smaller battery.”

Multi-Stream Audio for Better Performing Earbuds

Multi-Stream Audio will enable the transmission of multiple, independent, synchronized audio streams between an audio source device, such as a smartphone, and one or more audio sink devices.

“Developers will be able to use the Multi-Stream Audio feature to improve the performance of products like truly wireless earbuds,” comments Nick Hunn, CTO of WiFore Consulting and chair of the Bluetooth SIG Hearing Aid Working Group.

“For example, they can provide a better stereo imaging experience, make the use of voice assistant services more seamless, and make switching between multiple audio source devices smoother.”

Bluetooth Hearing Aids for People with Hearing Loss

Building on its low power, high quality, and multi-stream capabilities, LE Audio adds support for hearing aids. Bluetooth audio has brought significant benefits to a large percentage of the global population with wireless calling, listening, and watching, asserts Bluetooth SIG, and with the Bluetooth LE Audio the format will enable the development of Bluetooth hearing aids that bring all the benefits of Bluetooth audio to the growing number of people with hearing loss.

Broadcast Audio for Audio Sharing

LE Audio will also add Broadcast Audio, enabling an audio source device to broadcast one or more audio streams to an unlimited number of audio sink devices. Broadcast Audio opens significant new opportunities for innovation, including the enablement of a new Bluetooth use case, Audio Sharing. Bluetooth Audio Sharing can be personal or location-based.

With personal Audio Sharing, people will be able to share their Bluetooth audio experience with others around them; for example, sharing music from a smartphone with family and friends.

With location-based Audio Sharing, public venues such as airports, bars, gyms, cinemas, and conference centers can now share Bluetooth audio that augments the visitor experience, the Bluetooth SIG group adds.

About the Author

Robert Archer
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Robert Archer:

Bob is an audio enthusiast who has written about consumer electronics for various publications within Massachusetts before joining the staff of CE Pro in 2000. Bob is THX Level I certified, and he's also taken classes from the Imaging Science Foundation (ISF) and Home Acoustics Alliance (HAA). Bob also serves as the technology editor for CE Pro's sister publication Commercial Integrator. In addition, he's studied guitar and music theory at Sarrin Music Studios in Wakefield, Mass., and he also studies Kyokushin karate at 5 Dragons and Brazilian jiu-jitsu at Binda Brazilian Jiu Jitsu; both schools are located in Haverhill, Mass.

ARTICLE TOPICS:

Audio/VideoWireless AVNewsWireless

ARTICLE TAGS:

Bluetooth