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That this company makes this product and that people actually buy it proves what P.T. Barnum said:  “There’s a sucker born every minute”.  A fool and his money are soon parted.  And the fools that install these power cords will swear up and down that they makes a huge difference.  It’s consumer fraud. Caveat emptor.

Posted by topp on Friday, October 19, 2018
Comment on 'For High-Performance Audio, Don't Skimp on Power Cords, Conditioners'.

I’m not a business. I’m not high-tech. But I was pointed to this page when searching various home security systems/rebranding. HISTORY: I was very pleased with my Protection One service for over 15 years…skip over several years in an apartment and I’m now living with my daughter in a condo. Several years ago we purchased an ADT system and could not be more disappointed in the customer service we are receiving. CURRENT: We’ve been getting Delinquent notices for a PAID-UP subscription through December. Not one customer service agent could assist me, giving the explanation they “couldn’t see that screen”. I was sent to the research dept. email (because they don’t provide their phone number) which return said they would get back to me in 4-6 business days. Today is Day 4 and no email. In the meantime, I have gotten another delinquent notice in the postal mail! BILLING: My account page indicates a MasterCard has been continuously charged up to 6 times—payment denied—for TWO WEEKS after my (09/26/18) check was cashed by ADT. No record of that check appears in my billing history although it has been credited and is showing a $0.00 balance. The last CS agent I spoke with said apparently it was the card used to initiate the startup in 2016. I have never had a MasterCard and the startup clearly shows in my billing history that was paid by check! Last year (2017) I erroneously made 2 payments, 2 months in a row and no courtesy email or letter was sent.

****How can a company (Protection One) that provided such satisfactory service, be reduced to such innane billing errors (ADT), which screen a CS agent cannot even view?****

Like I said, this may not be the venue for my comments, but there has to be an executive who reads comments and is interested in the face they are showing to the public. When my subscription runs out, I will do the same. And for certain I will do my homework regarding “buyouts” before entering into another contract.

Posted by mimimilli on Wednesday, October 17, 2018
Comment on 'ADT Reveals 2017 Plans, Protection 1 Integration, Connected Home Opportunities'.

Nobody cares about certifications. Actually nobody cares. electricians dominate the pre-wires with the most worthless layouts, design and thought process = (none). Does the contractor care? Nope! There is no standards for a homeowner to compare against. There are no standards to say this is a lousy job. Nothing to justify why a new built home is held accountable to today’s technology.  Certification means nothing to the client as they are just as dumb about what their buying versus their neighbor or friend or the contractor. Hell, we have a custom builder who thinks running no Cat5. but running coax to 1 gang box in the garage is adequate for the cable/satellite guy.  Oh, right, isn’t everything BlueTooth Now?

Posted by dbendell on Sunday, October 14, 2018
Comment on '4 Tips to Beat the A/V Trunkslammers'.

I agree with this article 100% with the same reservation that most of the other professionals noted. There is no value attached with the CEDIA certification. My team is certified through classroom factory training, online training, and I make considerable investment in this arena. Almost all of the CEDIA training is backwards from where my staff is at today. It is a waste of time and money to run down that path. And I can ill-afford to hire a new tech that does not have minimum experience far beyond where CEDIA starts.

The worst part is that the IoT is moving faster than the syllabus at CEDIA can keep pace with. I view networking skillsets, factory certified, design capable, cloud use, installation skillsets being the most critical elements.

Posted by sjm mycloudbusters.com on Saturday, October 13, 2018
Comment on '4 Tips to Beat the A/V Trunkslammers'.

I agree with this article 100% with the same reservation that most of the other professionals noted. There is no value attached with the CEDIA certification. My team is certified through classroom factory training, online training, and I make considerable investment in this arena. Almost all of the CEDIA training is backwards from where my staff is at today. It is a waste of time and money to run down that path. And I can ill-afford to hire a new tech that does not have minimum experience far beyond where CEDIA starts.

The worst part is that the IoT is moving faster than the syllabus at CEDIA can keep pace with. I view networking skillsets, factory certified, design capable, cloud use, installation skillsets being the most critical elements.

Posted by sjm mycloudbusters.com on Saturday, October 13, 2018
Comment on '14 Wiring Fails That Will Churn Your Stomach'.

The echo link amp appears to have an IR window on the front bottom right corner.  Does anyone know if the Echo Link Amp has an IR Remote control along with Alexa voice control.  IR it indeed does have IR, it would be great to use for TV audio for rooms with built in speakers (ie, kitchen, bathroom, bedroom etc ....)  Hey Julie can you reach out to Amazon and find out if the Echo Link Amp will have and IR Remote.  I’ve searched everywhere and keep seeing the IR target in the bottom corner on pictures however no journalist or blogger has mentioned what the IR window on the front of the Echo Link Amp is for or if it has an IR remote.  I’m surprised nobody’s asked this question

Posted by djsedm on Thursday, October 11, 2018
Comment on 'Analysis: What Those New Amazon Echo Products Mean for the Smart-Home Channel'.

Oh gawd, just what we need, another proprietary solution.  I pity the poor consumer who trusts Google to “do the right thing” without understanding that their chronic corporate ADHD almost guarantees this architecture will be abandoned long before the “smart” LEDs they bought to go with their Google Home have seen even a fraction of their service life.

Posted by Steve Hoge on Wednesday, October 10, 2018
Comment on 'A Google Home First: Local Integration with GE Smart Bulbs via BLE - No Network Needed*'.

Finally.  I want to trigger events in my ELAN system based on thermal rather than motion.  Turn on a light or have a audio recording play on my Video Intercom.

One of the problems facing the Pro side of the Surveillance/Security industry is the DIY products are less expensive and better.  Google or whomever can put out a pretty decent camera, but the interface and the backend features of the camera are difficult for traditional CCTV providers to compete with. 

Additionally, they aren’t really even trying.  Put a camera up, put a NVR in, set it to record motion, maybe setup an email or push notification and thats about it.

If we want to compete it wont be on price and it has to be on features.  Those features will be triggering other things in the house to automatically do something.  We are losing in this area.

Posted by brandenpro on Wednesday, October 10, 2018
Comment on 'Thermal Imaging: The Most Underutilized Tech Tool for Security, Surveillance and IoT Applications'.

Great comment S1. John was very clear in his discussion that it can be a long and grueling process to convert but most of that was a year:s worth of evaluating every aspect of their business process. He appreciated that that was part of the CW experience. The SW alone wouldn’t otherwise do a lick of good thx for chiming in..

Posted by Julie Jacobson on Wednesday, October 10, 2018
Comment on 'That Giant Sucking Sound is Your Profit, Sinking One Balun at a Time: CEDIA Expo Tech Talk'.

It is not uncommon for business owners to seize upon software as the “silver bullet” that will solve their profitability issues. But as we regularly remind our clients, it’s not software, it’s process.

Software implementations are difficult and expensive and often fail. (Congrats to John T that his was successful.) Before embarking on such a challenging journey, better to examine such basics as revenue recognition, customer deposit accounting, inventory management, and labor productivity.

There are many “ways” that integrators address these fundamentals. Software like CW and DTools and iPoint and others are tools that attempt to support multiple ways.

We’ve learned that finding a way first - ie, defining and implementing a process - greatly enhances the ability to choose the right tools.

Posted by S1szt on Wednesday, October 10, 2018
Comment on 'That Giant Sucking Sound is Your Profit, Sinking One Balun at a Time: CEDIA Expo Tech Talk'.

Hi, Mbaty, as a matter of fact they paid nothing for it. They did pay to sponsor the CEDIA talk, but the follow-up article was all me. I thought it was fascinating and felt I did a pretty good job highlighting the very generic wisdom that John T. so graciously shared with his cohorts. Hopefully you found a few takeaways in here. Thanks for reading.

Posted by Julie Jacobson on Tuesday, October 9, 2018
Comment on 'That Giant Sucking Sound is Your Profit, Sinking One Balun at a Time: CEDIA Expo Tech Talk'.

How much did CW pay for this article?

Posted by mbaty on Tuesday, October 9, 2018
Comment on 'That Giant Sucking Sound is Your Profit, Sinking One Balun at a Time: CEDIA Expo Tech Talk'.

And if I may continue in summary;
Sonnenfeld’s talk provides a good overview of this entire issue. He described his personal theater, which he loves; It’s a 16’ wide scope screen with a cinema technology based projector. This is about a $100K display for projection and screen, assuming a side masking system like VistaScope. By the way he’s shooting his current Netflix show in the 2.0:1 ratio known as Univisium, interestingly enough.

His same image size and format can be displayed with direct LED, like the 0.9mm pitch from Leyard/Planar.
I worked up a chart of cinema formats using direct LED options from Planar, and organized it in a spread sheet specifically because direct LED is NOT scalable as claimed in the article. But projection certainly is, and infinitely scalable at that. You can’t zoom your way to an image size requirement with micro LED. You need to hit cinema/video pixel counts and aspect ratios in order to avoid dramatic processing problems and aesthetic issues for example.

So, in my chart I have a display that measures 7’ x 16’ with a pixel structure of 2160 x 5120. It is a 2.40:1 aspect ratio, with a 5K pixel structure that is identical to the Barco Loki CinemaScope. The LokiCS projector would be a great upgrade to Sonnenfeld’s theater if he wanted the 5K UHD HDR benefits from a 10,000 Lumen laser projector. But in his room, micro LED would offer no real benefit over the Loki/Vistascope package. Not performance, or lifespan. Yes, he could watch TV with the lights up, but for that benefit he’d pay about $500K today. It just doesn’t make sense.

In our CEDIA centric world micro LED at given sizes, for specific viewing distances, has real potential. Especially for high ambient light spaces. But for theater applications, nothing performs better, lasts longer or is more scalable than laser driven DLP on reference grade screens.
Nothing at least when the metrics are cinema based.

Thanks again for continuing the conversation in our industry on topics as timely as this one.
Cheers,

John Bishop - President; b/a/s/ Bishop Architectural Entertainment Services
                Founder; TASoPCA The American Society of Personal Cinema Architects
                Director: Architectural Audio Services & Architectural Cinema for the James Loudspeaker Co.

Posted by jrbishop on Tuesday, October 9, 2018
Comment on 'Invasion of the Giant MicroLEDs and the Pesky Question of LCR Speakers: CEDIA Tech Talk'.

Hi Julie,
Great topic;
But not so fast on the demise of projection, or the perhaps dubious advantages of Micro LED elicited by the panel. Micro LED is a coming technology and even Hollywood is working on new standards for it, related to the Digital Cinema Initiatives (DCi), to bring this display technology into technical and artistic compliance with the creative community’s expectations. And by the way, they can run at 100nits (the Dolby Vision Luminance standard) as well as 1,000nits!

But micro LED is not considered a replacement for projection in cinema in part due to LED’s performance and economic disadvantages which are largely missed in this article. Of course, the panel is from a company that only makes TV’s, so they have a bias, and perhaps a lack of understanding of projection in cinema. But in any case, let’s not impugn the undisputed king of cinema displays today, and into the foreseeable future, and that is projection, and here’s why;

1. First & foremost, don’t forget about the economics. The 146” Wall as Samsung calls it was quoted at CEDIA to be a $380,000 retail item. That’s about $2,600 a diagonal inch! You can easily match that size with a projector & screen using products available at Best Buy starting at $20 per diagonal inch! The Samsung CinemaWall deployed in a couple theaters in South Korea, and one experimental location in SoCal is an 18’ x 33’ screen using 2.5mm dot pitch panels to yield a 2160 x 4096 pixel image. Its cost is also in that $300K to $400K range. Even if it drops to half that over time, that’s double the cost of projection for a screen half the size of many cinema screens. These are important economic barriers today and for some time to come.

2. Performance is the next issue. The Samsung comment about micro LED’s superior uniformity is factual, relative to all LCD TV’s which have horrible white field uniformity, and even OLED which struggles with dark field issues. However, no display technology yet can match the superior uniformity and white field purity of a cinema grade DLP image projected onto a reference post production quality screen, like the Stewart Filmscreen’s SnoMatte, (tested to resolve better than 16K on screens as small as 10’ wide). Barco is a vendor that makes all of these technologies and they are quick to recognize that the reference in cinema today is DLP in general, with 6P laser being today’s ‘best of the best’.

3. ‘There isn’t a projector on the market that can do that’ – This ‘headline’ from the article refers to image performance in high ambient light. The very premise is a false one. NO DIRECTOR wants their art viewed in high ambient light on a giant TV. The willing suspension of disbelief is a core principle in cinematic story-telling, and the escapism for a couple hours into a world created by Hitchcock or Tarantino depends on it. A lit room is the antithesis of that, and if it weren’t, you might see cinema projection on high ambient light rejection ‘conference room’ screens where they would compete with direct LED in that environ. But the uniformity problems of those screens would cause Hollywood to reject them as well.

4. The last items in the Samsung pitch relate to black levels and economic value compared to projection. First, black levels in cinema are a function of the environment more than the technology, and to the extent TV tech turns black into a glossy monolith is not considered to be good in cinema circles. It looks like a TV, not a cinema image. Barry Sonnenfeld referred to this in his talk at CEDIA and said specifically ‘I wouldn’t want to watch a movie on any big (85”) TV on the market today’. Regarding life span, the 100,000 hours of LED is theoretically true, but doesn’t by any means eclipse the life span of Laser light sources. And ultimately the LED’s failure will be either an individual pixel, dead or stuck on, or a panel failure of which there are 100’s in a typical screen. Lifespan benefits are fake news.

Thanks for bringing us the latest news on the latest technologies, as things are changing fast!
Cheers,

Posted by jrbishop on Tuesday, October 9, 2018
Comment on 'Invasion of the Giant MicroLEDs and the Pesky Question of LCR Speakers: CEDIA Tech Talk'.

bobplotkin, are you in touch with your original installer? Please email me directly jjacobson@ehpub.com. thx

Posted by Julie Jacobson on Thursday, October 4, 2018
Comment on 'WAVE Electronics Acquired by Kingswood Capital, Merges with AVAD'.

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