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Networking & Cables

Vanco HDMI 2.1 Ultra High Speed Cables Support 8K and Beyond

Two new lines of cables from Vanco offer futureproof solutions for handling 4K, High Dynamic Range and support for 10K and higher.

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Posted by bobrapoport on May 11, 2019

On March 29, 2019, an article in CE Pro about the new Samsung line of TVs for 2019 said HDMI v2.1 compliance testing is not ready for many of the features listed in the Vanco v2.1 cables:

HDMI 2.1 Developments + eARC

Scott Cohen, Samsung’s senior training manager,
conducted a deep dive into HDMI 2.1 features and
other technologies available from Samsung for the
first time with the rollout of its 2019 4K and 8K
UHD TVs.


In HDMI developments, Samsung has forged ahead with HDMI 2.1 features in 4K and 8K TVs even though the HDMI Licensing Administrator (LA), which licenses HDMI technology, hasn’t released compliance-testing specifications for all HDMI 2.1 features.

Although the HDMI 2.1 Compliance Test Spec (CTS) was released last year, an HDMI LA spokesman said, “not all features have tests defined in it, and those will come out in phases.”

To date, “features supported in the CTS so far are eARC [enhanced Audio Return Channel] and the connectors, and that’s all that can be tested and certified,” he said.

Although CE vendors can ship products with some HDMI 2.1 features, he noted, “as soon as a feature’s test is available, then manufacturers must pass that test with no grace period, so it is risky for them to release a product before the test because if it fails, then they are stuck. The exception to that is the Cat 3 cable – Ultra High Speed HDMI Cable – which must pass the cable tests prior to shipment without exception.”

Consumers are confused enough already so its important to be accurate.  There will be no native 8K movies or TV shows from the studios anytime soon; instead consumers will continue to use their HDMI v2.0 for 4K cables and sources, the displays will upscale that 4K content to 8K internally.  With the 4K adoption rate slower than anticipated, still well under 50% saturation, pitching 8K now is premature.  Some might even call it fake news.  Gamers are the possible exception but its still a long ways off for them too.

1 Comments
Posted by bobrapoport on May 11, 2019

On March 29, 2019, an article in CE Pro about the new Samsung line of TVs for 2019 said HDMI v2.1 compliance testing is not ready for many of the features listed in the Vanco v2.1 cables:

HDMI 2.1 Developments + eARC

Scott Cohen, Samsung’s senior training manager,
conducted a deep dive into HDMI 2.1 features and
other technologies available from Samsung for the
first time with the rollout of its 2019 4K and 8K
UHD TVs.


In HDMI developments, Samsung has forged ahead with HDMI 2.1 features in 4K and 8K TVs even though the HDMI Licensing Administrator (LA), which licenses HDMI technology, hasn’t released compliance-testing specifications for all HDMI 2.1 features.

Although the HDMI 2.1 Compliance Test Spec (CTS) was released last year, an HDMI LA spokesman said, “not all features have tests defined in it, and those will come out in phases.”

To date, “features supported in the CTS so far are eARC [enhanced Audio Return Channel] and the connectors, and that’s all that can be tested and certified,” he said.

Although CE vendors can ship products with some HDMI 2.1 features, he noted, “as soon as a feature’s test is available, then manufacturers must pass that test with no grace period, so it is risky for them to release a product before the test because if it fails, then they are stuck. The exception to that is the Cat 3 cable – Ultra High Speed HDMI Cable – which must pass the cable tests prior to shipment without exception.”

Consumers are confused enough already so its important to be accurate.  There will be no native 8K movies or TV shows from the studios anytime soon; instead consumers will continue to use their HDMI v2.0 for 4K cables and sources, the displays will upscale that 4K content to 8K internally.  With the 4K adoption rate slower than anticipated, still well under 50% saturation, pitching 8K now is premature.  Some might even call it fake news.  Gamers are the possible exception but its still a long ways off for them too.