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Home Theater

Tom Cruise PSA: Turn off HDTV Motion Smoothing, Avoid ‘Soap-Opera Effect’

Taking to Twitter, Tom Cruise wages war on video interpolation (motion smoothing), garnering thousands of responses from A/V geeks and jokesters alike.

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2 Comments
Posted by AndreFloyd on December 7, 2018

We all know the danger of using generalizations, but apparently some of us use them anyway.

In the video, Tom states that “most TVs come with motion smoothing turned on by default” and says that manufacturers make it difficult for users to turn it off.  In Sony projectors there are nine Picture Modes or Calibrated Presets.  The Motionflow default is different depending on the mode you choose.  For “movie modes” (Cinema Film 1, Cinema Film 2, Reference and Bright Cinema) the default is “True Cinema” which removes the 2:3 pulldown that is built into the 60 fps video format.  For “TV modes” (TV and Bright TV) the default is “Smooth Low” which provides some interpolation that makes the image appear smoother with less motion blur but does not incur the “soap opera effect” which is quite evident in “Smooth High” setting.  Smooth High setting is certainly appropriate for watching televised sports like hockey and basketball which is created at 60 fps but includes inherent undesirable motion blur.  Smooth High is not recommended for dramatic programming, but Smooth Low is not objectionable for dramatic content.  For the remaining picture modes (Photo, Game and User) the default setting is “Off”.

Setting Motionflow to “Off” will actually provide a result that is not what the creators intended because the native video signal has motion judder due to the fact that it is not mathematically possible to evenly divide 60 by 24.  True Cinema mode takes advantage of the 120 fps refresh rate of the projector to properly display movie content by showing each frame of the movie for 1/24th of a second, as it was created.

Of course, at any time and in any picture mode the user can easily access and change the Motionflow setting to the choice they prefer.  When a user first presses the “Menu” button on the projector or remote control, the picture menu appears and Motionflow is the fifth item down on this menu screen.  Selecting Motionflow on this screen brings up a list of choices (which may vary slightly depending on projector model) and the user can easily choose any available mode, including OFF.

Posted by Carlton Bale on December 8, 2018

For the next PSA, they should warn website designers against having static navigation headers and hovering ads that make watching embedded videos extremely frustrating on mobile devices, especially when the videos don’t automatically play in full screen and the full-screen video control buttons don’t work. Yes, I’m talking to you CEPro.
https://i.imgur.com/l9xpM4K.png

2 Comments
Posted by Carlton Bale on December 8, 2018

For the next PSA, they should warn website designers against having static navigation headers and hovering ads that make watching embedded videos extremely frustrating on mobile devices, especially when the videos don’t automatically play in full screen and the full-screen video control buttons don’t work. Yes, I’m talking to you CEPro.
https://i.imgur.com/l9xpM4K.png

Posted by AndreFloyd on December 7, 2018

We all know the danger of using generalizations, but apparently some of us use them anyway.

In the video, Tom states that “most TVs come with motion smoothing turned on by default” and says that manufacturers make it difficult for users to turn it off.  In Sony projectors there are nine Picture Modes or Calibrated Presets.  The Motionflow default is different depending on the mode you choose.  For “movie modes” (Cinema Film 1, Cinema Film 2, Reference and Bright Cinema) the default is “True Cinema” which removes the 2:3 pulldown that is built into the 60 fps video format.  For “TV modes” (TV and Bright TV) the default is “Smooth Low” which provides some interpolation that makes the image appear smoother with less motion blur but does not incur the “soap opera effect” which is quite evident in “Smooth High” setting.  Smooth High setting is certainly appropriate for watching televised sports like hockey and basketball which is created at 60 fps but includes inherent undesirable motion blur.  Smooth High is not recommended for dramatic programming, but Smooth Low is not objectionable for dramatic content.  For the remaining picture modes (Photo, Game and User) the default setting is “Off”.

Setting Motionflow to “Off” will actually provide a result that is not what the creators intended because the native video signal has motion judder due to the fact that it is not mathematically possible to evenly divide 60 by 24.  True Cinema mode takes advantage of the 120 fps refresh rate of the projector to properly display movie content by showing each frame of the movie for 1/24th of a second, as it was created.

Of course, at any time and in any picture mode the user can easily access and change the Motionflow setting to the choice they prefer.  When a user first presses the “Menu” button on the projector or remote control, the picture menu appears and Motionflow is the fifth item down on this menu screen.  Selecting Motionflow on this screen brings up a list of choices (which may vary slightly depending on projector model) and the user can easily choose any available mode, including OFF.