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Home Theater

How Sound Affects Your Home Theater Customers’ Emotions

By appealing to customers' emotions via certain soundtracks and biological reactions to music, integrators may be able to boost sales of home theater equipment.

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4 Comments
Posted by jrbishop on May 15, 2018

Nice job Richard,
I love a passion for cinema, sound and image! Your emphasis on sound reminded me of a theater boot up evening I enjoyed with one of my favorite high-end dealers in Ct. Realm. Their demo screening room is a cinematic tour de force with a Barco Prometheus 4K DCi laser DLP, driving a 10’ x 18.5’ Stewart Filmscreen Director’s Choice with SFC’s post production reference ST100 surface. So, the image is beyond reference, but I was there that evening because we lit up the audio system, we didn’t yet have an image. The audio is Dolby Atmos designed using the Dolby 850 pro-cinema processor driving a 42-channel spherical audio environment in an acoustically architect-ed & isolated 12,000 cu’ space. Sound cal had just been completed and we put what was then a brand-new piece of content on; Mad Max Fury Road! We listened at cinema standard levels in amazement; to the entire movie! (Fine wine was involved…etc) That movie was nominated and won all the sound category Oscars that year, and we understood why, as even without a picture we were mesmerized. I can tell you when the image is at the same level, like it is in their theater, you can watch an entire movie without sound as well, for the same reason, the art is inspiring!

Tomorrow I’m bench marking a significant residential cinema which has the same Barco DCi projector driving another 10’ high Stewart Filmscreen, but this one is a 24’ wide VistaScope! We set it up for 7 pixel mapped and masked aspect ratios. We’ve got a Trinnov Altitude 32 driving another ATMOS configuration in the newly licensed consumer architecture of 9.4.6. We have 3 light level modes for SDR, HDR, and KDD (Kentucky Derby Day - lights up:). When you have reference sound and image in a design based on genuine cinema standards, the art is elevated to a higher level. In keeping with your thesis I’d say we use the science of cinema in service of the art of movies. And when it comes together, there’s nothing like it. And when the right client is shown the way, it can drive sales towards the high end. Hope so at least!

For those interested I’m giving a class at CEDIA Expo in San Diego titled ‘Architectural Cinema’, where the performance criteria for the audio and video aspects of a genuine cinema based residential design is discussed. CEDIA members can go to the CEDIA Community blog where I just posted a synopsis under a Murray Kunis thread ‘Larger than 100”.  I helped answer his question on DLED imaging tech along with other imaging issues, and the topic came up.
Enjoyed the passion Richard,
Cheers,

p.s. fyi and to your musical point Richard; A classic film recently ran on TCM, that illustrates the historic and emotional importance of music in everyday life. The movie, Love in the Afternoon, features Gary Cooper as a playboy millionaire, with Audrey Hepburn and Maurice Chevalier. His multi-room music system is a string quartet who follows him from room to room, outdoors, and to the steam room. He has music everywhere. Not bad for 1957. It’s a 1.85:1 film in beautifully restored black and white. See it on a DLP to see it at its best! Another classic, this time on the visual art side, is Lars Von Trier’s Breaking the Waves, it’s a brutal scope movie that uses art quality scene transition landscapes, a lot like 12 Years a Slave did. It is art and emotional rescue at the same time.   

Posted by wayne cavd.co.uk on May 16, 2018

Great article Richard. An emotional connection is worth so much more than many other factors that get attention when designing a sound system, whether for a stereo room or top end home cinema. What I’ve noticed over the years, working in pro audio, hifi and home cinema is that different products can convey the emotion in sound well, or badly! Plenty of products can have a great specification but not get the musical message across. Conversely, some products can at first appear to have a slight dull or unexciting sound, but before you know it you’re drawn into the music or movie fully. Its fascinating, and all sits exactly in line with the world of musical instruments and microphones and recording for example, where equipment decisions are often made on feel and emotional connections, rather than clarity and/or specs. C.I. integrators who manage to find the time to listen and choose speakers and amplifiers that draw you in will will earn very happy customers.
Cheers!

 

Posted by JCK1970 on May 18, 2018

Wow, nice way to hijack someone’s article jrbishop.

Richard Fairbrother, nice article.  I particularly liked the way you use different soundtracks to influence your customers decisions.  When I conduct these types of presentations for my various clients, I sometime change my go to discs based upon their age. “Star Wars” (1977) is always a favorite, but I also like to use the theme from “Psycho” (1959) “Blade Runner” (1982) and “Snow Falling on Cedars” (1999).

Posted by HBlaugh on May 21, 2018

Great article.  Emphasize to our audio prospect/customer - “Every time you turn it on, your doing something good for yourself & everyone else too.”
Another great resource on science of sound is from a recording engineer in his book “This Is Your Brain On Music” by Daniel Levitin. Audio book highly recommended.

4 Comments
Posted by HBlaugh on May 21, 2018

Great article.  Emphasize to our audio prospect/customer - “Every time you turn it on, your doing something good for yourself & everyone else too.”
Another great resource on science of sound is from a recording engineer in his book “This Is Your Brain On Music” by Daniel Levitin. Audio book highly recommended.

Posted by JCK1970 on May 18, 2018

Wow, nice way to hijack someone’s article jrbishop.

Richard Fairbrother, nice article.  I particularly liked the way you use different soundtracks to influence your customers decisions.  When I conduct these types of presentations for my various clients, I sometime change my go to discs based upon their age. “Star Wars” (1977) is always a favorite, but I also like to use the theme from “Psycho” (1959) “Blade Runner” (1982) and “Snow Falling on Cedars” (1999).

Posted by wayne cavd.co.uk on May 16, 2018

Great article Richard. An emotional connection is worth so much more than many other factors that get attention when designing a sound system, whether for a stereo room or top end home cinema. What I’ve noticed over the years, working in pro audio, hifi and home cinema is that different products can convey the emotion in sound well, or badly! Plenty of products can have a great specification but not get the musical message across. Conversely, some products can at first appear to have a slight dull or unexciting sound, but before you know it you’re drawn into the music or movie fully. Its fascinating, and all sits exactly in line with the world of musical instruments and microphones and recording for example, where equipment decisions are often made on feel and emotional connections, rather than clarity and/or specs. C.I. integrators who manage to find the time to listen and choose speakers and amplifiers that draw you in will will earn very happy customers.
Cheers!

 

Posted by jrbishop on May 15, 2018

Nice job Richard,
I love a passion for cinema, sound and image! Your emphasis on sound reminded me of a theater boot up evening I enjoyed with one of my favorite high-end dealers in Ct. Realm. Their demo screening room is a cinematic tour de force with a Barco Prometheus 4K DCi laser DLP, driving a 10’ x 18.5’ Stewart Filmscreen Director’s Choice with SFC’s post production reference ST100 surface. So, the image is beyond reference, but I was there that evening because we lit up the audio system, we didn’t yet have an image. The audio is Dolby Atmos designed using the Dolby 850 pro-cinema processor driving a 42-channel spherical audio environment in an acoustically architect-ed & isolated 12,000 cu’ space. Sound cal had just been completed and we put what was then a brand-new piece of content on; Mad Max Fury Road! We listened at cinema standard levels in amazement; to the entire movie! (Fine wine was involved…etc) That movie was nominated and won all the sound category Oscars that year, and we understood why, as even without a picture we were mesmerized. I can tell you when the image is at the same level, like it is in their theater, you can watch an entire movie without sound as well, for the same reason, the art is inspiring!

Tomorrow I’m bench marking a significant residential cinema which has the same Barco DCi projector driving another 10’ high Stewart Filmscreen, but this one is a 24’ wide VistaScope! We set it up for 7 pixel mapped and masked aspect ratios. We’ve got a Trinnov Altitude 32 driving another ATMOS configuration in the newly licensed consumer architecture of 9.4.6. We have 3 light level modes for SDR, HDR, and KDD (Kentucky Derby Day - lights up:). When you have reference sound and image in a design based on genuine cinema standards, the art is elevated to a higher level. In keeping with your thesis I’d say we use the science of cinema in service of the art of movies. And when it comes together, there’s nothing like it. And when the right client is shown the way, it can drive sales towards the high end. Hope so at least!

For those interested I’m giving a class at CEDIA Expo in San Diego titled ‘Architectural Cinema’, where the performance criteria for the audio and video aspects of a genuine cinema based residential design is discussed. CEDIA members can go to the CEDIA Community blog where I just posted a synopsis under a Murray Kunis thread ‘Larger than 100”.  I helped answer his question on DLED imaging tech along with other imaging issues, and the topic came up.
Enjoyed the passion Richard,
Cheers,

p.s. fyi and to your musical point Richard; A classic film recently ran on TCM, that illustrates the historic and emotional importance of music in everyday life. The movie, Love in the Afternoon, features Gary Cooper as a playboy millionaire, with Audrey Hepburn and Maurice Chevalier. His multi-room music system is a string quartet who follows him from room to room, outdoors, and to the steam room. He has music everywhere. Not bad for 1957. It’s a 1.85:1 film in beautifully restored black and white. See it on a DLP to see it at its best! Another classic, this time on the visual art side, is Lars Von Trier’s Breaking the Waves, it’s a brutal scope movie that uses art quality scene transition landscapes, a lot like 12 Years a Slave did. It is art and emotional rescue at the same time.