Enter the Top New Technology Awards!
Security

Home Tech Pros Should Get Hyperlocal With Nextdoor.com, Other Neighborhood Networks

Security dealers and home-tech integrators should try Nextdoor.com to generate hyperlocal business, referrals and repeat customers in a very efficient manner.

·

Read full article.

6 Comments
Posted by jmcdermott1678 on December 28, 2018

Great find, Julie!  Thanks for the tip. I can see a lot of uses for this, and gets away from the chaos that is Facebook.

Posted by SpivR on December 28, 2018

Good armchair quarterbacking, but have you actually been on Next-door and looked at the discussions?

It has the most bottom-feeder won’t-spend-a-penny mentality of consumers.  You would be better of trolling Craigslist.

If I want to know the latest “crazy man wandering around the neighborhood” alerts, it might be a good place to visit, but unless you are looking for “hang and bang” $50 jobs, forget it.

Posted by Julie Jacobson on December 28, 2018

Hi, SpivR—Yes indeed, I’ve spent a lot of time on the site, as mentioned in the blog. I’ve been studying posts and comments and the apparent success of contractors who engage with the community there. I also mentioned there’s a whole lot of junk on the site—I mean, how can so many pets in one neighborhood go missing?!

But I also gave my own example of using Ruben for a $1,000 tree job, going off nothing but comments on Nextdoor. We didn’t haggle. We didn’t seek second opinions or competitive bids. We just said OK to his suggestions and his price, and that was that.

Every sales and marketing effort will deliver a whole bunch of hooey. In some cases you hone the effort to yield better results. In other cases you drop the effort and move on. In the case of nextdoor.com, I personally find it mostly laughable, sometimes interesting, often useful, and NEVER a time suck. Some of your associates might be on the site, and could take advantage of any opportunities. IN any case, it’s free, and I see no reason not to explore its potential and get a better understanding of “hyperlocal social networking.”

There are major secondary benefits for amassing a large a following in a small geographical area, or “owning the neighborhood.”

Posted by Julie Jacobson on December 28, 2018

jmcdermott—Glad you discovered a new outlet. Take some time with the site. Most of the stuff is comical (as I mentioned in response to Spivr, but depending on your neighborhood, there could be good opportunities for gaining clients and an even more substantial opportunity for “owning the neighborhood.”

Posted by highfigh on December 30, 2018

You’ll never understand unless and until you work for others as some kind of contractor (this applies to anyone, even someone who cuts the grass or shovels snow). It’s one thing to do it as ‘the neighborhood kid’ but as a business, it becomes something else.

While some are looking for work that’s done professionally and maybe better than what they had had in previous experiences, many are looking for work done for less, because “We live in the same neighborhood, so it will be discounted, right?”. I have gotten work from Neighborhood.com, but nothing in my immediate area- the looks from me stating my labor rate to people who live near me tells the whole story and I’m not the most expensive, by any means.

There’s also the issue of the people on that or any other social media site- some people are odd, weird, creepy and truly strange- we have one who sends private messages to argue about things from threads that were closed because of their posts, start conversations as if we’re old friends and my favorite, “We should get together”. That also means that they know where I live (to the extent of any info I have included in my profile. I don’t want people coming here to tell me that their cable box isn’t working, something else is wrong or just to ask questions and I certainly don’t want anyone coming here, thinking that I want them to visit.

While it might be good to gain more business, it would also mean I’m not available to my past customers in the way they like- doing an occasional hang & bang, a doorbell or a small camera job for a local WILL NOT take me from my other customers, but I would consider it if I could find a helper to grow the business to the point where the added overhead is justified and I don’t want to see or hear “Just hire someone”, either. Comments like that just show complete ignorance of the cost of being an employer.

Posted by highfigh on December 30, 2018

BTW- that Nest ad is a great example why people who don’t understand how things work shouldn’t try to DIY- not only did they go past the return period, they’re selling the item to someone who may think it still comes with a warranty. It doesn’t. The Ring ad is a good example of someone who doesn’t know how to adjust the settings. Good opportunities for someone who does this as a hobby, but for a business that charges by the hour and has at least one company vehicle, charging shop rate to change a few settings or sell the doorbell chime module for a Nest isn’t what the customer wants to hear- they think we should only charge for the time it takes.

6 Comments
Posted by highfigh on December 30, 2018

BTW- that Nest ad is a great example why people who don’t understand how things work shouldn’t try to DIY- not only did they go past the return period, they’re selling the item to someone who may think it still comes with a warranty. It doesn’t. The Ring ad is a good example of someone who doesn’t know how to adjust the settings. Good opportunities for someone who does this as a hobby, but for a business that charges by the hour and has at least one company vehicle, charging shop rate to change a few settings or sell the doorbell chime module for a Nest isn’t what the customer wants to hear- they think we should only charge for the time it takes.

Posted by highfigh on December 30, 2018

You’ll never understand unless and until you work for others as some kind of contractor (this applies to anyone, even someone who cuts the grass or shovels snow). It’s one thing to do it as ‘the neighborhood kid’ but as a business, it becomes something else.

While some are looking for work that’s done professionally and maybe better than what they had had in previous experiences, many are looking for work done for less, because “We live in the same neighborhood, so it will be discounted, right?”. I have gotten work from Neighborhood.com, but nothing in my immediate area- the looks from me stating my labor rate to people who live near me tells the whole story and I’m not the most expensive, by any means.

There’s also the issue of the people on that or any other social media site- some people are odd, weird, creepy and truly strange- we have one who sends private messages to argue about things from threads that were closed because of their posts, start conversations as if we’re old friends and my favorite, “We should get together”. That also means that they know where I live (to the extent of any info I have included in my profile. I don’t want people coming here to tell me that their cable box isn’t working, something else is wrong or just to ask questions and I certainly don’t want anyone coming here, thinking that I want them to visit.

While it might be good to gain more business, it would also mean I’m not available to my past customers in the way they like- doing an occasional hang & bang, a doorbell or a small camera job for a local WILL NOT take me from my other customers, but I would consider it if I could find a helper to grow the business to the point where the added overhead is justified and I don’t want to see or hear “Just hire someone”, either. Comments like that just show complete ignorance of the cost of being an employer.

Posted by Julie Jacobson on December 28, 2018

jmcdermott—Glad you discovered a new outlet. Take some time with the site. Most of the stuff is comical (as I mentioned in response to Spivr, but depending on your neighborhood, there could be good opportunities for gaining clients and an even more substantial opportunity for “owning the neighborhood.”

Posted by Julie Jacobson on December 28, 2018

Hi, SpivR—Yes indeed, I’ve spent a lot of time on the site, as mentioned in the blog. I’ve been studying posts and comments and the apparent success of contractors who engage with the community there. I also mentioned there’s a whole lot of junk on the site—I mean, how can so many pets in one neighborhood go missing?!

But I also gave my own example of using Ruben for a $1,000 tree job, going off nothing but comments on Nextdoor. We didn’t haggle. We didn’t seek second opinions or competitive bids. We just said OK to his suggestions and his price, and that was that.

Every sales and marketing effort will deliver a whole bunch of hooey. In some cases you hone the effort to yield better results. In other cases you drop the effort and move on. In the case of nextdoor.com, I personally find it mostly laughable, sometimes interesting, often useful, and NEVER a time suck. Some of your associates might be on the site, and could take advantage of any opportunities. IN any case, it’s free, and I see no reason not to explore its potential and get a better understanding of “hyperlocal social networking.”

There are major secondary benefits for amassing a large a following in a small geographical area, or “owning the neighborhood.”

Posted by SpivR on December 28, 2018

Good armchair quarterbacking, but have you actually been on Next-door and looked at the discussions?

It has the most bottom-feeder won’t-spend-a-penny mentality of consumers.  You would be better of trolling Craigslist.

If I want to know the latest “crazy man wandering around the neighborhood” alerts, it might be a good place to visit, but unless you are looking for “hang and bang” $50 jobs, forget it.

Posted by jmcdermott1678 on December 28, 2018

Great find, Julie!  Thanks for the tip. I can see a lot of uses for this, and gets away from the chaos that is Facebook.