Business

Deep Dive: Biophilia and Wellness in the Smart-Home Channel

CE Pro Deep Dive into the nascent biophilia category expands on the channel’s push into circadian lighting, indoor air quality, and other elements with which integrators should become familiar.

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2 Comments
Posted by mhealthtalk on August 3, 2019

Julie,
Congratulations on your truly excellent Wellness article. As someone who worked as a Sleep Economist and published dozens of articles on sleep (https://www.mhealthtalk.com/tag/sleep/), I was impressed by your grasp of the topic and how it relates to home design. I will share it through social media and with my colleagues in Austin.
I’m happy to see the homebuilding industry wake to the wellness opportunity with solutions like I first saw at the MGM Grand Hotel in Las Vegas. MGM realized early on that sleep was a top priority for guests who traveled through different time zones and must be rested for an important meeting the next day.
I also liked your reference to nature and electrification since we humans used to sleep almost two hours more 200 years ago. That was before Thomas Edison invented the light bulb. Some sleep experts see artificial lighting and resulting sleep deprivation as major contributors to a similar 200-year rise in cases of Alzheimer’s.
Because you mentioned air quality and human-centered lighting as complementary and part of a wellness emphasis, I’d like to also urge builders to include Universal Design principles. (https://www.mhealthtalk.com/designing-homes-for-older-adults/)
You also mentioned the continuum of lighting and air temperature throughout the day and how subtle changes affect mood, so you probably already know of Philips’ School/Vision lighting system, which lets teachers adjust lighting to energize students or get them focused. (https://www.lighting.philips.com/main/systems/lighting-systems/schoolvision)
When writing my first article on the economic value of sleep, I was disappointed to not find any published study on the topic, so I developed a spreadsheet model to estimate it. Even with my conservative assumptions, it showed that good sleep could increase earning capacity by $8 million over a lifetime. That’s because of better health, increased productivity, faster and bigger promotions, and longer careers. (https://www.mhealthtalk.com/economic-value-of-sleep/)
But later I realized that those projected benefits would have been far greater if I started the model at birth. Good sleep has a huge impact on brain development in infants and is important to kids as they grow up and go through school. It can determine what university they can qualify for, whether they get a scholarship, what fields they can go into, and their starting salary. And all of those benefits are before my original model begins.
I mention this because health, wellness, and sleep can easily justify the installation of intelligent home systems and increase the value and sale price substantially.
As you know, I’ve been a Smart Home advocate for decades, since introducing IBM to the concept in the early 1990s before later retiring from the company in 1999. And I’ve published many of my own articles on the topic. One that I think is important to the building industry and marketers who want to promote this technology looks at why it’s taken so long for the Smart Home to cross the chasm to mass-market adoption. See “The Elusive Smart Home” at https://mHealthTalk.com/elusive-smart-home/.

Posted by Julie Jacobson on August 6, 2019

Thanks so much for these wonderful comments. You should consider joining our biophilia/biodigitry linkedin group: bit.ly/Biodigitry

2 Comments
Posted by Julie Jacobson on August 6, 2019

Thanks so much for these wonderful comments. You should consider joining our biophilia/biodigitry linkedin group: bit.ly/Biodigitry

Posted by mhealthtalk on August 3, 2019

Julie,
Congratulations on your truly excellent Wellness article. As someone who worked as a Sleep Economist and published dozens of articles on sleep (https://www.mhealthtalk.com/tag/sleep/), I was impressed by your grasp of the topic and how it relates to home design. I will share it through social media and with my colleagues in Austin.
I’m happy to see the homebuilding industry wake to the wellness opportunity with solutions like I first saw at the MGM Grand Hotel in Las Vegas. MGM realized early on that sleep was a top priority for guests who traveled through different time zones and must be rested for an important meeting the next day.
I also liked your reference to nature and electrification since we humans used to sleep almost two hours more 200 years ago. That was before Thomas Edison invented the light bulb. Some sleep experts see artificial lighting and resulting sleep deprivation as major contributors to a similar 200-year rise in cases of Alzheimer’s.
Because you mentioned air quality and human-centered lighting as complementary and part of a wellness emphasis, I’d like to also urge builders to include Universal Design principles. (https://www.mhealthtalk.com/designing-homes-for-older-adults/)
You also mentioned the continuum of lighting and air temperature throughout the day and how subtle changes affect mood, so you probably already know of Philips’ School/Vision lighting system, which lets teachers adjust lighting to energize students or get them focused. (https://www.lighting.philips.com/main/systems/lighting-systems/schoolvision)
When writing my first article on the economic value of sleep, I was disappointed to not find any published study on the topic, so I developed a spreadsheet model to estimate it. Even with my conservative assumptions, it showed that good sleep could increase earning capacity by $8 million over a lifetime. That’s because of better health, increased productivity, faster and bigger promotions, and longer careers. (https://www.mhealthtalk.com/economic-value-of-sleep/)
But later I realized that those projected benefits would have been far greater if I started the model at birth. Good sleep has a huge impact on brain development in infants and is important to kids as they grow up and go through school. It can determine what university they can qualify for, whether they get a scholarship, what fields they can go into, and their starting salary. And all of those benefits are before my original model begins.
I mention this because health, wellness, and sleep can easily justify the installation of intelligent home systems and increase the value and sale price substantially.
As you know, I’ve been a Smart Home advocate for decades, since introducing IBM to the concept in the early 1990s before later retiring from the company in 1999. And I’ve published many of my own articles on the topic. One that I think is important to the building industry and marketers who want to promote this technology looks at why it’s taken so long for the Smart Home to cross the chasm to mass-market adoption. See “The Elusive Smart Home” at https://mHealthTalk.com/elusive-smart-home/.