Business

Which of These Vehicle Designs Makes Best First Impression?

Vehicle design can be great marketing tools for CE pros. Which one these vehicles does it best?


Which of These Vehicle Designs Makes Best First Impression?
What are the best marketing messages to put on your work vehicle?

Photos & Slideshow

Jason Knott · October 31, 2017

Vehicle design is an often overlooked marketing method for custom integrators.  You only get a chance to make a good first impression once... just ask your spouse or significant other!

There’s also a popular saying that goes “don’t judge a book by its cover.” However, when its comes to spending your hard-earned money on something, you want the shiniest, biggest, most impressive thing you can find. One way custom integrators can do this is by having an attractive work vehicle to get them between jobs. It is, in essence, a moving marketing billboard about your company. 

Here are 7 key basic decisions every integrator must make about their vehicle:

  1. Color: A white vehicle will make your logo more noticeable, but will it be seen as much as a vehicle with a flashy color? Also, what fits with your company's overall marketing color scheme?
  2. Type of vehicle: Van are probably the most efficient for transporting equipment and tools, including ladders, but are they as eye-catching as a truck for panel truck? Also, what about gas mileage?
  3. Services: Is it important to include your company services, such as audio, video, security, etc.
  4. Brands: How valuable is it to showcase the particular brands you use, from Control4 to Bose?
  5. Images: Should you invest in an eye-catching vehicle wrap that can be noticed by passers-by
  6. Phone number: Obviously
  7. License number: In some states, this is required.

Check out this slideshow for 10 vehicles CE Pro recently spotted at the MRI Expo in Sturbridge, Mass. Vote on which one you believe makes the best first impression?

SEE RELATED: 11 Considerations for Your Next Work Vehicle



  About the Author

Jason has covered low-voltage electronics as an editor since 1990. He joined EH Publishing in 2000, and before that served as publisher and editor of Security Sales, a leading magazine for the security industry. He served as chairman of the Security Industry Association’s Education Committee from 2000-2004 and sat on the board of that association from 1998-2002. He is also a former board member of the Alarm Industry Research and Educational Foundation. He is currently a member of the CEDIA Education Action Team for Electronic Systems Business. Jason graduated from the University of Southern California. Have a suggestion or a topic you want to read more about? Email Jason at [email protected]

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  Article Topics


Business · Sales & Marketing · News · Media · Slideshow · Business Resource · MRI · All Topics
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Comments

Posted by Scot Hulshizer on November 6, 2017

Designs will always change, and while I think it is good to be current and appear relevant, the key consideration is how effective the messaging on the side will be to someone that sees the vehicle on the road or parked at a job site.  I can’t count how many times I’ve pulled up next to a commercial vehicle at a stoplight and made note of the name of the company if they offered services that I had been thinking about purchasing.

I think the critical elements are the name of the company (preferably not part of an obscure logo that is hard to read from a distance), the specific types of services offered, and basic contact information.  For a non-exclusive integrator representing multiple brands, I would avoid adding them.

It would be interesting to hear from anyone who has a specific story where changing their fleet branding resulted in a quantifiable increase in sales that could be directly attributed to the change.

Posted by MickMac on November 5, 2017

I know which one is least likely to be broken into in search of AV goodies(!)

Posted by Connected Living Inc. on November 5, 2017

I agree.  Most of these look dated.  We struggled with what to put on our trucks and decided to try and keep it simple and clean. https://www.instagram.com/p/BK_U736A7XA/?taken-by=connectedliving

Posted by mbaty on November 5, 2017

Yea, none of these stand out as anything special. They pretty much all look like they went to stickersformyvan.com and pumped out a few templates.

Posted by Francis Turgeon on November 5, 2017

I’m sorry but these designs were good in the 90’s. I think integrators in my region are a lot more actual and reflecting current marketing trends.. I would post pictures but I don’t think they are allowed in posts.

Posted by Francis Turgeon on November 5, 2017

I’m sorry but these designs were good in the 90’s. I think integrators in my region are a lot more actual and reflecting current marketing trends.. I would post pictures but I don’t think they are allowed in posts.

Posted by mbaty on November 5, 2017

Yea, none of these stand out as anything special. They pretty much all look like they went to stickersformyvan.com and pumped out a few templates.

Posted by Connected Living Inc. on November 5, 2017

I agree.  Most of these look dated.  We struggled with what to put on our trucks and decided to try and keep it simple and clean. https://www.instagram.com/p/BK_U736A7XA/?taken-by=connectedliving

Posted by MickMac on November 5, 2017

I know which one is least likely to be broken into in search of AV goodies(!)

Posted by Scot Hulshizer on November 6, 2017

Designs will always change, and while I think it is good to be current and appear relevant, the key consideration is how effective the messaging on the side will be to someone that sees the vehicle on the road or parked at a job site.  I can’t count how many times I’ve pulled up next to a commercial vehicle at a stoplight and made note of the name of the company if they offered services that I had been thinking about purchasing.

I think the critical elements are the name of the company (preferably not part of an obscure logo that is hard to read from a distance), the specific types of services offered, and basic contact information.  For a non-exclusive integrator representing multiple brands, I would avoid adding them.

It would be interesting to hear from anyone who has a specific story where changing their fleet branding resulted in a quantifiable increase in sales that could be directly attributed to the change.