CE Pro BEST Product Awards | CE Pro BEST Project Awards
Networking & Cables

Vanco HDMI 2.1 Ultra High Speed Cables Support 8K and Beyond

Two new lines of cables from Vanco offer futureproof solutions for handling 4K, High Dynamic Range and support for 10K and higher.

Vanco HDMI 2.1 Ultra High Speed Cables Support 8K and Beyond
Vanco's new lines of Ultra High Speed HDMI Cables with Ethernet reportedly support the HDMI 2.1 spec and resolutions up to 10K.

Lisa Montgomery · May 3, 2019

4K has established itself as the norm, but 8K is breathing down its neck. Cabling needs to keep pace with the constant boost of resolution. Vanco International is ensuring that the cabling installed today will be able to handle 4K, 8K or something even higher with the release of two new lines of Ultra High Speed HDMI Cables with Ethernet.

Vanco claims the two cable lines provide uncompressed support for the HDMI 2.1 specification.

“Vanco is renowned for its long history of being first to market with the latest and most innovative cable technology, starting with the release of our original HDMI cables back in 2004” says Vanco International president, Mark Corbin.

“With the launch of our latest Ultra High Speed HDMI Cables with Ethernet, we are once again ahead of the curve, providing our distributors and dealers with some of the first solutions that support resolutions up to 10K.”

Ultra High Speed Cables Support eARC, Dolby Atmos 

Both the HD8K and PROHD8K line of cables offer uncompressed bandwidth of 48 Gbps, according to the company, and support resolutions up to 10K, plus 8K@60Hz, 4:4:4 Chroma, and 4K@120Hz. The cables also support High Dynamic Range (HDR) video and wide angle 21:9 video aspect ratio.

The cables also ensure that audio is top notch by featuring enhanced Audio Return Channel (eARC), and support of formats including DTS Master, DTS:X, Dolby TrueHD, and Dolby Atmos.

Read Next: eARC at CEDIA—The One Question to ask TV and AVR Manufacturers

For gaming enthusiasts, the HD8K and PROHD8K deliver a punch by supporting Variable Refresh Rate to reduce and eliminate lag, stutter, and frame tearing.

Quick Frame Transport (QFT) reduces latency for better experiences with virtual reality. Auto Low Latency Mode (ALLM) allows for an automatic setting for lag-free and uninterrupted viewing and interactivity.

The HD8K and PROHD8K Ultra High Speed HDMI Cables with Ethernet will begin shipping late May 2019 and will be available in 1-, 3-, and 6-foot lengths with both PVC and premium metal connectors.



We're Looking for Your BEST Projects

Don’t miss your chance to enter to win a 2019 BEST Projects Award. We’ll be announcing winners at a special Gala event at CEDIA EXPO. We can’t wait to see what you’ve been up to this year! Enter your projects now.




  About the Author

Lisa Montgomery has been a member of the CE Pro and Electronic House editorial teams for nearly 20 years; most of that time as the Editor of Electronic House. With a knack for explaining complex high-tech topics in terms that average consumers can understand, her style of writing resonates with people who are interested in adding electronic systems to their homes, but are unsure of the steps involved and the solutions available. From basic lighting control systems to full-blown automation systems, Lisa understands the home electronics market well, and is able to point consumers in the right direction on their quest for a smarter, more convenient, efficient and enjoyable home. Over the years, she has developed close relationships with key manufacturers and seasoned custom electronics professionals, giving her a keen sense of what home technologies are hot now and what is on the horizon. She shares this wisdom regularly through feature stories, product roundups, case studies technology spotlights and comprehensive guides and books. Have a suggestion or a topic you want to read more about? Email Lisa at lisa.montgomery@emeraldexpo.com

Follow Lisa on social media:

Lisa also participates in these groups:
LinkedIn · Google+

View Lisa Montgomery's complete profile.



  Article Topics


Networking & Cables · HDMI · News · Products · 8K · Dolby Atmos · DTS:X · eARC · HDMI 2.1 · Vanco · All Topics
CE Pro Magazine

Read More Articles Like This… With A Free Subscription

CE Pro magazine is the resource you need to keep up-to-date on the latest products, techniques, designs and business practices. Subscribe today!

Subscribe Today!

Comments

Posted by bobrapoport on May 11, 2019

On March 29, 2019, an article in CE Pro about the new Samsung line of TVs for 2019 said HDMI v2.1 compliance testing is not ready for many of the features listed in the Vanco v2.1 cables:

HDMI 2.1 Developments + eARC

Scott Cohen, Samsung’s senior training manager,
conducted a deep dive into HDMI 2.1 features and
other technologies available from Samsung for the
first time with the rollout of its 2019 4K and 8K
UHD TVs.


In HDMI developments, Samsung has forged ahead with HDMI 2.1 features in 4K and 8K TVs even though the HDMI Licensing Administrator (LA), which licenses HDMI technology, hasn’t released compliance-testing specifications for all HDMI 2.1 features.

Although the HDMI 2.1 Compliance Test Spec (CTS) was released last year, an HDMI LA spokesman said, “not all features have tests defined in it, and those will come out in phases.”

To date, “features supported in the CTS so far are eARC [enhanced Audio Return Channel] and the connectors, and that’s all that can be tested and certified,” he said.

Although CE vendors can ship products with some HDMI 2.1 features, he noted, “as soon as a feature’s test is available, then manufacturers must pass that test with no grace period, so it is risky for them to release a product before the test because if it fails, then they are stuck. The exception to that is the Cat 3 cable – Ultra High Speed HDMI Cable – which must pass the cable tests prior to shipment without exception.”

Consumers are confused enough already so its important to be accurate.  There will be no native 8K movies or TV shows from the studios anytime soon; instead consumers will continue to use their HDMI v2.0 for 4K cables and sources, the displays will upscale that 4K content to 8K internally.  With the 4K adoption rate slower than anticipated, still well under 50% saturation, pitching 8K now is premature.  Some might even call it fake news.  Gamers are the possible exception but its still a long ways off for them too.

Posted by bobrapoport on May 11, 2019

On March 29, 2019, an article in CE Pro about the new Samsung line of TVs for 2019 said HDMI v2.1 compliance testing is not ready for many of the features listed in the Vanco v2.1 cables:

HDMI 2.1 Developments + eARC

Scott Cohen, Samsung’s senior training manager,
conducted a deep dive into HDMI 2.1 features and
other technologies available from Samsung for the
first time with the rollout of its 2019 4K and 8K
UHD TVs.


In HDMI developments, Samsung has forged ahead with HDMI 2.1 features in 4K and 8K TVs even though the HDMI Licensing Administrator (LA), which licenses HDMI technology, hasn’t released compliance-testing specifications for all HDMI 2.1 features.

Although the HDMI 2.1 Compliance Test Spec (CTS) was released last year, an HDMI LA spokesman said, “not all features have tests defined in it, and those will come out in phases.”

To date, “features supported in the CTS so far are eARC [enhanced Audio Return Channel] and the connectors, and that’s all that can be tested and certified,” he said.

Although CE vendors can ship products with some HDMI 2.1 features, he noted, “as soon as a feature’s test is available, then manufacturers must pass that test with no grace period, so it is risky for them to release a product before the test because if it fails, then they are stuck. The exception to that is the Cat 3 cable – Ultra High Speed HDMI Cable – which must pass the cable tests prior to shipment without exception.”

Consumers are confused enough already so its important to be accurate.  There will be no native 8K movies or TV shows from the studios anytime soon; instead consumers will continue to use their HDMI v2.0 for 4K cables and sources, the displays will upscale that 4K content to 8K internally.  With the 4K adoption rate slower than anticipated, still well under 50% saturation, pitching 8K now is premature.  Some might even call it fake news.  Gamers are the possible exception but its still a long ways off for them too.