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Power-Cord Warning: Don’t Even Think About Mounting Your LG Wallpaper TV Like That

You know that ribbon power-cord that connects the new ultra-thin LG Wallpaper to the connection hub? You can’t hide it behind the wall.

Power-Cord Warning: Don’t Even Think About Mounting Your LG Wallpaper TV Like That
LG Wallpaper TV: Don't do this.

Julie Jacobson · January 5, 2017

LG shows some beautiful pictures of its new paper-thin Wallpaper OLED TV clinging to the wall with a magnet. The thing is: they forget to show the ribbon cable that powers the thing.

The cable runs from the TV to a big ugly hub that provides power, video and connectivity to the display.

LG Wallpaper TV with ribbon connector, correctly mounted.

As it happens, the cable is not in-wall rated per the NFPA electrical codes.

LG knows this.

A representative tells CE Pro that, while the cable is not in-wall rated, it does have a “fire-proof coating.”

The cable is in fact low-voltage DC (not line-voltage 120v AC), but the cable's rating is what matters. 

Consumers themselves are free to do whatever they’d like with the cable, but professional installers: Don't do that.

A tiny notice below a picture of the TV with a hidden cable reads:

Display cable is not in-wall rated, please consult with your retailer for proper in-wall installation.

CE Pro would be curious to know what "proper in-wall installation" would entail.

UPDATE: Kevin Holm of Holm Electrictric responds:

Proper installation in the wall would be to run it inside a conduit or smurf tube terminated at both ends in a flush-mount box of the correct rating. It cannot be a low-voltage ring. The cable then needs to have the correct insulation for transmitting the power and data on it, which it should be if it's UL listed

What would the NFPA say about "proper in-wall installation"?


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  About the Author

Julie Jacobson, recipient of the 2014 CEA TechHome Leadership Award, is co-founder of EH Publishing, producer of CE Pro, Electronic House, Commercial Integrator, Security Sales and other leading technology publications. She currently spends most of her time writing for CE Pro in the areas of home automation, security, networked A/V and the business of home systems integration. Julie majored in Economics at the University of Michigan, spent a year abroad at Cambridge University, earned an MBA from the University of Texas at Austin, and has never taken a journalism class in her life. She's a washed-up Ultimate Frisbee player currently residing in Carlsbad, Calif. Email Julie at jjacobson@ehpub.com

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  Article Topics


Home Theater · Displays · Events · CES · News · Products · LG · All Topics
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Comments

Posted by chamberlux on January 27, 2017

Best solution IMO, would be to invest in a proper surround sound setup given the relatively large investment in a display.

If the ENTIRE point of having a soundbar is to shrink the cost of installation… what does this product actually offer that a broken out system wouldnt offer, for the same money and time?

Posted by John Nemesh on January 17, 2017

@VR500 Remember, there is ALWAYS a solution!  It might not be a CHEAP solution, but that’s not our problem, is it? smile

Posted by VR500 on January 10, 2017

Agreed, but the TV’s magnetic mounting plate sits flush to the wall, so installing a retrofit (a.k.a. “new work”) electrical box, which sits about 1/8” proud of the wall, behind the TV is not a trivial matter. Also, the ribbon cable is around 1.25” wide, which will require a 1.5” conduit. In new-construction jobs, this is a pretty simple problem (where you can install a box that sits flush to the drywall) that will take less than $50 in parts. But, in retrofit jobs, it’ll require a lot of trial and error and doing it invisibly, with the TV sitting flush to the wall, is going to be hit-and-miss. You’ll need to have your thinking cap on, for sure.

Posted by John Nemesh on January 10, 2017

There is an article on CNet (which references this CEPro article) here:  https://www.cnet.com/news/lg-w7-wallpaper-tv-has-a-cable-thats-not-up-to-in-wall-electrical-code/

The article says the proper way to install the cable in-wall is to put it in a conduit connected to enclosed electrical boxes.  I am guessing someone willing to pay the $8000 for the set isn’t going to quibble if it costs extra to put in conduit.

Posted by VR500 on January 8, 2017

Julie, you’re correct. The person doing the work is the one who’s responsible for meeting code requirements. The homeowner cannot provide guidance to a contractor that supersedes local or national code. Homeowners are permitted to perform electrical work in their own homes without requiring a license, but the work (both high and low-voltage) must always be performed to applicable code.

Posted by Julie Jacobson on January 8, 2017

I don’t believe that’s the case, Rudyvalle. Just because the customer says it’s OK for you to break code ... doesn’t mean you can. You would still be liable if there was a fire.

Posted by Rudyvalle on January 8, 2017

Samsung and Sony did the same in the beginning. The home owner has the last saying just get it in writing!!!!

Posted by Home Technology Expert on January 6, 2017

You can not just install an AV recessed box behind TV to solve the non in-wall rated ribbon cable. The HDMI inputs are located on the sound bar/ Hub

The best solution is in-wall rated smurf tube terminated with j boxes

Posted by toslink on January 6, 2017

The problem I have with this is the realities of a code-compliant installation run counter to how LG is advertising the television in the vast majority of their photos. I think almost every client who’s interested in the TV doesn’t want to see the ribbon cable extending from below the thin display down to the soundbar, where it gets video and power. I’m quite certain the requirement for CL or CMG rating of the cable was not considered early in the product’s design. Those of us who have been in the industry long enough remember when Pioneer made the same mistake with their early plasma televisions with the companion “media box”. The first generation’s cable was not rated for in-wall use. It wasn’t until the following year that they released one that was. I suspect LG will get it right on subsequent generations.

Posted by Ernie G on January 6, 2017

This is truly ridiculous, but this industry has often been ridiculous. Imagine introducing an entire new video standard, which of course would be used on the greatest high-end systems, where the equipment would often be dozens of feet away from the display… and its new video signal technology can’t go more than six feet. That’s how HDMI was introduced, and even S Video years before it!  (We’ve seen advertisements for corded telephones with nary a wire in sight. I think I’ve even seen a photo of a roof antenna with no cable cluttering up the scene.)

I’ve often thought the people who invent this stuff make it work on a workbench less than six feet wide. That’s good enough to for their narrow minds to decide they can make everything that works on a larger scale obsolete. New technology, that will be used for big systems, is always introduced completely unable to be used that way.

This is just more pat-myself-on-the-back silliness.

View all comments.

Posted by jhamill1 on January 5, 2017

Good job, LG! Doing something that bone-headed, who do they think they are, Samsung?

Posted by postrin on January 5, 2017

Can’t we just put an intuitive or middle Atlantic recessed enclosure behind it like we have for every tv that needs to be installed very close to the wall?

Posted by TotalControlRemotes on January 5, 2017

Perhaps the same guy who invented the NEST outdoor security camera (requires external outlet to plug in) invented this as well?

A TV AV backbox will take care of this problem for those who really worry (besides, you have to deal with connectivity wires anyway, don’t you?  At least one HDMI cable).  But you have to wonder what the thought process is when developing these things.

Posted by Joshuaad on January 6, 2017

This TV was not designed with custom install in mind. Yet it’s their top of the line, Signature Series… I guess custom install is not really a factor in the world wide market? No matter. Get the lower end models, the picture is just as good. PS: Sony’s OLED TV’s have a similar issue, and Samsung’s QLED has a cable connecting to a hub as well, don’t think it’s unwell rated, and I’d be afraid to run it in the wall it’s so thin…

Posted by Joshuaad on January 6, 2017

Then again, that’s why we get paid the big bucks: to figure out custom solutions despite manufacturing short sightedness… ^_-

Posted by Ernie G on January 6, 2017

This is truly ridiculous, but this industry has often been ridiculous. Imagine introducing an entire new video standard, which of course would be used on the greatest high-end systems, where the equipment would often be dozens of feet away from the display… and its new video signal technology can’t go more than six feet. That’s how HDMI was introduced, and even S Video years before it!  (We’ve seen advertisements for corded telephones with nary a wire in sight. I think I’ve even seen a photo of a roof antenna with no cable cluttering up the scene.)

I’ve often thought the people who invent this stuff make it work on a workbench less than six feet wide. That’s good enough to for their narrow minds to decide they can make everything that works on a larger scale obsolete. New technology, that will be used for big systems, is always introduced completely unable to be used that way.

This is just more pat-myself-on-the-back silliness.

Posted by toslink on January 6, 2017

The problem I have with this is the realities of a code-compliant installation run counter to how LG is advertising the television in the vast majority of their photos. I think almost every client who’s interested in the TV doesn’t want to see the ribbon cable extending from below the thin display down to the soundbar, where it gets video and power. I’m quite certain the requirement for CL or CMG rating of the cable was not considered early in the product’s design. Those of us who have been in the industry long enough remember when Pioneer made the same mistake with their early plasma televisions with the companion “media box”. The first generation’s cable was not rated for in-wall use. It wasn’t until the following year that they released one that was. I suspect LG will get it right on subsequent generations.

Posted by Home Technology Expert on January 6, 2017

You can not just install an AV recessed box behind TV to solve the non in-wall rated ribbon cable. The HDMI inputs are located on the sound bar/ Hub

The best solution is in-wall rated smurf tube terminated with j boxes

Posted by Rudyvalle on January 8, 2017

Samsung and Sony did the same in the beginning. The home owner has the last saying just get it in writing!!!!

Posted by Julie Jacobson on January 8, 2017

I don’t believe that’s the case, Rudyvalle. Just because the customer says it’s OK for you to break code ... doesn’t mean you can. You would still be liable if there was a fire.

View all comments.