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Want to Sell More 4K TVs? Start Selling 8K TVs… Now!

L.A. integrator says high price points for 8K TVs actually boost 4K TV sales dramatically.

Want to Sell More 4K TVs? Start Selling 8K TVs… Now!
Just One Touch/Video & Audio Center in Los Angeles reports that showcasing 8K TVs has increased 4K display sets among customers. Joseph Akhtarzad (left) and Tom Campbell are just as excited now about 8K as they were last fall when they first demo'ed the giant 85-inch Samsung 8K TV.

Jason Knott · January 24, 2019

If you want to showcase 8K for clients, the time is now!

CES 2019 was the big coming-out party for 8K TVs. Sony, LG, Samsung, Sharp and TCL all showed their new 8K displays, and judging from the throngs crowded around them in Las Vegas, the TVs were well received.

But every integrator knows that other than the demo material there is no 8K content. CBS has announced it will use several 8K cameras in the end zones with “augmented reality” during Super Bowl LIII on February 3 (as well a 16 4K cameras from its total 115 cameras on site.)

NBC has announced the 2020 Olympics in Tokyo will be shot in 8K.

But according to CE Pro 100 integrator Tom Campbell, corporate director/chief technologist at Just One Touch/Video & Audio Center in Los Angeles, the lack of content is a weak excuse for integrators to not offer 8K TVs to their clients… now!

Just One Touch has already sold 103 85-inch Samsung 8K displays at $14,999 a pop since the sets debuted last October. That’s $1.5 million for those of us who are math-challenged… at solid margin by the way. But the real windfall for Just One Touch from offering 8K sets has come in its the 4K display sales.

"8K has enhanced our 4K sales… no doubt about it."
— Tom Campbell, Just One Touch/Video & Audio Center

“We were concerned that selling 8K displays would impair our 4K TV sales, but just the opposite has happened. It has spurred out 4K TV sales. Because the price points for 4K sets are substantially lower than 8K, customers go for it after they see the 8K,” says Campbell.

“The high cost of 8K has increased the value of 4K. 8K has enhanced our 4K sales… no doubt about it.  When a customer sees a gorgeous 8K TV but it costs $15,000, they compare it to a 4K TV that they can purchase for about $2,000, and they go with it.”

Just One Touch, an HTSA member, just completed its best holiday sales season ever, much of it from 4K TV sales. 

"Remember, 4K was just introduced two years ago. Back then, we said the same thing about lack of 4K content that we are saying about 8K content now," remarks Campbell. 

Related: Samsung Launches MicroLED 4K and 8K Displays at CES 2019

At CES, Samsung announced five new 8K TV sizes that are all due out in the spring at 65-, 75-, 82-, 85-, and a monster 98-inch 8K unit. The 65-inch has a retail price of just $4,999, but Campbell is not worried. Even that $5,000 price point is well above the 4K price points.

At Just One Touch, the sales team upconverts a 4K signal to the 8K sets for demos. Campbell admits the market for 8K is primarily among affluent, early adopters only right now.

In the run-up to the Super Bowl, Just One Touch is holding an 8K “Big Game Event” in a private location in tony Bel Air, Calif. The company will be setting up 8K TVs and inviting its top clients and celebrities for an all-day catered event.



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  About the Author

Jason Knott is Chief Content Officer for Emerald Expositions Connected Brands. Jason has covered low-voltage electronics as an editor since 1990, serving as editor and publisher of Security Sales & Integration. He joined CE Pro in 2000 and serves as Editor-in-Chief of that brand. He served as chairman of the Security Industry Association’s Education Committee from 2000-2004 and sat on the board of that association from 1998-2002. He is also a former board member of the Alarm Industry Research and Educational Foundation. He has been a member of the CEDIA Business Working Group since 2010. Jason graduated from the University of Southern California. Have a suggestion or a topic you want to read more about? Email Jason at jason.knott@emeraldexpo.com

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  Article Topics


Home Theater · Displays · Business · CEPro 100 · Sales & Marketing · News · 4K · 8K · CES 2019 · HTSA · LG · Samsung · All Topics
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Comments

Posted by jrbishop on February 1, 2019

Hi Jason,
I’m surprised no comments have come in on this 8K TV story.
But before I put my 2 cents in, let me say Tom Campbell is an institution in my mind, having grown up in SoCal. My first CE company job was as a bench tech and installer for Jean’s Tape Centers in Long Beach, Bellflower and Norwalk in the mid 70’s. At the time Pacific Stereo and University Stereo were the big dogs. Campbell was spokesman for University as I recall, then he moved on the DOW in San Diego. He has to be the best pitch man in the history of specialty AV, and he’s still at it!

Here’s the rub with the 8K story in my opinion. First, everyone knows its a fake content entity, we still number 4K content in the hundreds not thousands, and we’re 6 years into it. 8K content will always be a fraction of 4K, and the old 4K pitch certainly doesn’t fly….‘movies are shot in 4K so we’ll have thousands of titles in no time’. That didn’t happen because the truth was they shoot with 3K or 4K cameras to yield 2K content after editing and effects are added. They shoot with 6K cameras for 4K output. You’d have to shoot with 12K cameras to yield 8K results if any editing is planned, and all movies do plan on it. And there aren’t any 12K cinema cameras to my knowledge.

Live 8K or custom developed content will be a novelty but mainstream….highly unlikely. It’s really a video wall technology with custom content creators.

So they say it doesn’t hurt sales because 4K TV’s are cheaper. Sure, Porsche doesn’t hurt Kia sales, but tell the world there’s a new car to buy that outperforms Porsche and see what happens.

Customers will wait, the high end ones particularly, if the industry implies a new and better tech is coming. When it’s fake news, we do our industry, and high end clientele a disservice by suggesting it’s real. Let them prove it first, like they did with 3D, and 4K. Both were fake. It’s HDR and wide color gamut that has become real, and now pro-cinema companies are producing new 2K projectors with HDR capability. That’s a prudent path that does justice to our industry and high end clients as well.

I can’t think of a dumber product category than consumer 8K right now, from a high end perspective.
A minority opinion perhaps, but it’s the way I see it.
Thanks for keeping us informed as usual.
Cheers,

Posted by jrbishop on February 1, 2019

Hi Jason,
I’m surprised no comments have come in on this 8K TV story.
But before I put my 2 cents in, let me say Tom Campbell is an institution in my mind, having grown up in SoCal. My first CE company job was as a bench tech and installer for Jean’s Tape Centers in Long Beach, Bellflower and Norwalk in the mid 70’s. At the time Pacific Stereo and University Stereo were the big dogs. Campbell was spokesman for University as I recall, then he moved on the DOW in San Diego. He has to be the best pitch man in the history of specialty AV, and he’s still at it!

Here’s the rub with the 8K story in my opinion. First, everyone knows its a fake content entity, we still number 4K content in the hundreds not thousands, and we’re 6 years into it. 8K content will always be a fraction of 4K, and the old 4K pitch certainly doesn’t fly….‘movies are shot in 4K so we’ll have thousands of titles in no time’. That didn’t happen because the truth was they shoot with 3K or 4K cameras to yield 2K content after editing and effects are added. They shoot with 6K cameras for 4K output. You’d have to shoot with 12K cameras to yield 8K results if any editing is planned, and all movies do plan on it. And there aren’t any 12K cinema cameras to my knowledge.

Live 8K or custom developed content will be a novelty but mainstream….highly unlikely. It’s really a video wall technology with custom content creators.

So they say it doesn’t hurt sales because 4K TV’s are cheaper. Sure, Porsche doesn’t hurt Kia sales, but tell the world there’s a new car to buy that outperforms Porsche and see what happens.

Customers will wait, the high end ones particularly, if the industry implies a new and better tech is coming. When it’s fake news, we do our industry, and high end clientele a disservice by suggesting it’s real. Let them prove it first, like they did with 3D, and 4K. Both were fake. It’s HDR and wide color gamut that has become real, and now pro-cinema companies are producing new 2K projectors with HDR capability. That’s a prudent path that does justice to our industry and high end clients as well.

I can’t think of a dumber product category than consumer 8K right now, from a high end perspective.
A minority opinion perhaps, but it’s the way I see it.
Thanks for keeping us informed as usual.
Cheers,