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new ideas to get work?
Posted: 27 October 2008 09:17 AM   [ Ignore ]
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Does anyone have any new ideas to get new clients?? and if so has it been working?

we did alot of cold calls last year and it worked well but now the ppl we have been calling just have no work,or are in survival mode,I just wanted to see what others are doing.

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Posted: 27 October 2008 11:49 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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losboskie—have you looked at contacting your previous clients to sell to them again?

It’s going to be much easier to upgrade customers you’ve already dealt with than to find new people with cash to spend.

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Posted: 27 October 2008 12:33 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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Jason Unger - 27 October 2008 11:49 AM

losboskie—have you looked at contacting your previous clients to sell to them again?

It’s going to be much easier to upgrade customers you’ve already dealt with than to find new people with cash to spend.

of course…i just posted the topic to talk about different maybe innovative or new ideas.

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Posted: 28 October 2008 08:05 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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Here’s a thought, when you go direct to the consumer/ home owner it’s a new sales process every time.  Try also going after contractors, architects, interior designers etc.  Once on board with a contractor, you can become their A/V or low volt sub contractor of choice.  Then you can be almost guaranteed a job when they get it and you only have to try to upsell from there.

Another concept.  Develop a very “cost effective” background music solution for retail/ doctors office/ commercial applications.  For those who wanted it, they’ll already have it, but for those who didn’t think of it or didn’t want to pay for it, you could come in with something affordable, quick to install and then you are there to offer other services.

Happy Selling,

Morgan

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Morgan Harman
Volutone
http://www.Volutone.com

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Posted: 04 November 2008 08:25 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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Commercial business has been very good the year for us and more than made up residential business. Conference room a/v and automation can be provided using surround sound equipment and lighting control.

We also provide NEC telephone systemsm basic networking and wiring to commercial.

Another area I’ve been trying is small church’s. Pro Audio is a whole new game. Front Projection and wall mounted LCD’s can be a good niche for commercial and church’s. Have looked at digital signage software too. but haven’t tried to sell it yet. .

Good luck….

[ Edited: 04 November 2008 08:29 PM by CWC ]
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Posted: 05 November 2008 08:54 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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CWC - 04 November 2008 08:25 PM

Commercial business has been very good the year for us and more than made up residential business. Conference room a/v and automation can be provided using surround sound equipment and lighting control.

We also provide NEC telephone systemsm basic networking and wiring to commercial.

Another area I’ve been trying is small church’s. Pro Audio is a whole new game. Front Projection and wall mounted LCD’s can be a good niche for commercial and church’s. Have looked at digital signage software too. but haven’t tried to sell it yet. .

Good luck….

how are you getting the small chuches?

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Posted: 05 November 2008 05:42 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
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Contacts have come from residential customers and builders.

I always tell my commercial customers we do residential, and residential we can there commercial. Now I need to advise both we can provide services to their church.

I think the retrofit market is the best short term opportunity. I’m going to invest $10k on a cable TV commercial for December - Feburary targeted at Residential and Commercial.

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Posted: 10 September 2010 09:20 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
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Here are a couple ideas I have found helpful

1) Ask for the problem child. 
Unfortunately a lot of our peers are screwing up jobs by the handful.  Approach a custom builder you have been trying to get business from, and instead of asking to bid a new project, ask to fix his problem home.  He has one for sure.  You know, the homewoner with an unresolved punchlist and a control system poorly programmed.  Fix this for a nominal fee, and you will be this builder’s friend for life.  You just saved him several phone calls a day from his most dissatisfied homeowner.

2) Partner with noncompetitive trades.
This is golden, especially in commercial.  Partner with a Telephone Service/System provider, IT Support company, Fire Protection/Sprinkler company or Electrician.  Their clients are always asking them to do AV work or if they know anyone who does.  It is not their core business and most would prefer to hand off the customer to a trusted partner rather than deal with it.  Be prepared to reciprocate, referring them when you are setting up a new conference center, etc.

There are a lot of great ideas floating around.

Mark C

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Best and God Bless,

Mark Coxon

“Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic”-Arthur C. Clarke

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Posted: 12 October 2010 09:19 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 8 ]
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Have you ever looked into new homeowner data? There are a number of online sources—here’s one, for example: http://www.newhomedata.net/

Getting a standard letter of introduction together with an offer you’re comfortable with (free remote with system, free evaluation, free installation on speakers purchased, etc) will ensure you get your message in front of some of the most likely buyers in your local area.

Usually, this data includes home value or loan amount…if you want to make the marketing investment for what may be larger opportunities, you could send these prospects a small housewarming gift welcoming them to the neighborhood along with your letter.

If you are looking into mover data, I’d suggest a source that does not include renters. The litmus test for this is whether the data includes loan information, indicating a mortgage.

Best of Luck
Adam Levy
SnapAV

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Posted: 12 October 2010 11:57 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 9 ]
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This is a bit outdated, as it was 2008, but it gives a good insight as to what people find important in a connected home, and places people into categories that you can develop sales tracts for.
I built a successful sales strategy from a report like this in 2007, where we emphasized different features of the same products depending on our audience.

http://www.caba.org/2008connectedhomestudy

The summary is a few pages and is free if you fill out the form.

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Best and God Bless,

Mark Coxon

“Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic”-Arthur C. Clarke

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Posted: 13 October 2010 12:15 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 10 ]
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Here is another idea worth exploring. . .

Do something different.  There are 1000 integrators regurgitating the same Home Theaters with red acoustic panels with wood stained columns and velvet rope theaters, that feature lit posters and an antique popcorn cart.  Wait, most have star ceilings as well.

What about teaming up with an architect that specializes in FLW or Eigler or Greene and Greene style homes?  Or a furniture maker with unique designs?  Maybe a contractor that specializes in remodel of historic homes in a posh area of town?  Or a downtown facelift project that wants to recreate the nostalgia of times past?  Then, actually do some research and create AV design that is cohesive with the intent of the project and the vision of the architect.

When you sell an experience, especially one that encapsulates an architectural movement or a period in time, you find yourself avoiding some of the low margin, high competition “product and install” jobs that are so prevalent.

Maybe I’m off base.

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Best and God Bless,

Mark Coxon

“Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic”-Arthur C. Clarke

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Posted: 13 October 2010 07:22 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 11 ]
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Mark Coxon - 13 October 2010 12:15 AM

Here is another idea worth exploring. . .

Do something different.  There are 1000 integrators regurgitating the same Home Theaters with red acoustic panels with wood stained columns and velvet rope theaters, that feature lit posters and an antique popcorn cart.  Wait, most have star ceilings as well.

What about teaming up with an architect that specializes in FLW or Eigler or Greene and Greene style homes?  Or a furniture maker with unique designs?  Maybe a contractor that specializes in remodel of historic homes in a posh area of town?  Or a downtown facelift project that wants to recreate the nostalgia of times past?  Then, actually do some research and create AV design that is cohesive with the intent of the project and the vision of the architect.

When you sell an experience, especially one that encapsulates an architectural movement or a period in time, you find yourself avoiding some of the low margin, high competition “product and install” jobs that are so prevalent.

Maybe I’m off base.

Mark,

The idea is a very good one , the problem i see in this particular area are these:

The lack of builders actually building anymore..its crazy but no one is doing anything here
the ones who are are lack knowledge of pro av electronic integration solutions and to save a couple of bucks choose the lower end trunk slammer guy who does a pathetic wiring job , puts an onq box in the wrong part of the house and him and the builder actually brag that this is a connected home.

Its a bit frustrating to try and educate these contractors when truly all they worry about is making the most money for themselves the fastest.

We have been getting more involved in commercial and love it , but longer jobs take longer time to finish. We are currently trying to focus on remodels to compliment the commercial work but I am still all ears to new ideas, i love sharing strategies.

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Posted: 13 October 2010 02:57 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 12 ]
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While I always agree with harvesting past clients, I offer my services to insurance companies as an adjuster. Since today’s systems are far too complicated for the, “average Joe,” adjuster to assign a replacement or repair cost to a clients’ flooded basement, (as an example), I’m hired & paid to cut through all the red tape for the insurance company to inform them what can be repaired, what equipment is totally outdated and not worth anything, and what can be replaced at a reasonable cost for the current equipment costs.

9 times out of 10, I not only get paid for my time no matter what, but I also get to sell & install the new equipment to keep it, “All in the family.”

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Posted: 13 October 2010 03:38 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 13 ]
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Dave Stevens - 13 October 2010 02:57 PM

While I always agree with harvesting past clients, I offer my services to insurance companies as an adjuster. Since today’s systems are far too complicated for the, “average Joe,” adjuster to assign a replacement or repair cost to a clients’ flooded basement, (as an example), I’m hired & paid to cut through all the red tape for the insurance company to inform them what can be repaired, what equipment is totally outdated and not worth anything, and what can be replaced at a reasonable cost for the current equipment costs.

9 times out of 10, I not only get paid for my time no matter what, but I also get to sell & install the new equipment to keep it, “All in the family.”

if you dont mind me asking , what d you charge them an hour?

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Posted: 14 October 2010 12:54 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 14 ]
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@losboskie
“The lack of builders actually building anymore..its crazy but no one is doing anything here”

AMEN Brother Boskie!  I hear you.  More integrators than houses, so that’s why you have to have a different story to tell.

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Mark Coxon

“Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic”-Arthur C. Clarke

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Posted: 14 October 2010 04:39 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 15 ]
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Loboskie,
The rates vary from company to company and job to job. The rates are determined by the following factors:

1. Size of claim.
2. Speed of resolving a matter by completing and submitting all paperwork and pictures.
3. Type of policy… size of deductible and amount of coverage client has.
4. The state the client lives in. I presently serve, NJ, NY, PA, and CT. Laws vary from state to state.
5. Travel time.
6. Amount of money saved by the insurance company due to accuracy of fair replacement cost values.

On average, (work for Chubb, Allstate, Liberty Mutual, and State Farm), I’m paid $250.00 per hour for in the field work and all office work prep. Travel time to & from claimant/client’s home is typically $100.00 per hour.

Again, this money is guaranteed to me, and the clock starts ticking the minute I pick up the phone. It’s great side work, and the insurance companies love the fact that this type of work is freelanced out while at the same time they don’t have to pay someone a full time salary or offer any benefits. Keep in mind, it is a sort of a seasonable business… the worse the weather gets the more calls. The rest of the year it all depends on fires or someone’s hot water heater blowing up.

I started doing this years ago when a great client of mine was, and still is, a VP of one of the top carriers. Let’s also not forget that 90% of the time, my company gets to do the job. Getting that portion of the business is completely up to the insured party. Speed & fairness to both client and carrier are key!

Best of luck… Also, I enjoy reading your posts- Great work and understanding of this business like our friend Mark Coxon.

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