Networking & Cables

Cybersecurity Business Models: Smart Home Pros Need to ‘Go There’

Home-technology specialists at HTSA conference agree cybersecurity is a threat to the smart-home industry, and an opportunity for their integration businesses, but don't quite know what to do about it.

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5 Comments
Posted by BryanKoutsky on March 30, 2017

It was a very interesting presentation… left you wanting to know more about how they are doing this, but at the same time, how we can prevent ourselves from being attacked.  Good article Julie, it was good to see you as always.

Posted by Eyal Kattan on March 31, 2017

Home networks, in most homes are wide open for hackers. Opened ports, remote access, cloud control, using DHCP…. All these and more are like backdoor left opened for hackers to grab.

Network security is a constantly-evolving industry of itself and with all do respect to our industry, I doubt it can be simplified in such a way that AV integrators can simply tweak a couple of properties and make the network more secured.

The Home Network needs to be designed, implemented, configured and maintained by network professionals, while the AV is becoming a “client” on the network.

I was recently requested by one of our distributors,  to test the new Luxul series of AV firewalls and was amazed by how limited the settings are compared to the enterprise-level firewalls we’ve been using.

Home networks are as mission-critical as enterprise networks and should be treated this way.

Posted by bhudkins on March 31, 2017

Julie,

I’m surprised, regarding cybersecurity, that you concluded that “few (HTSA members) had any ideas how to turn it into an opportunity”. HTSA named Bjorn Jensen of Why Reboot as last year’s man of the year because of the extraordinary support he delivered to many HTSA members. Not only was he the man of the year, Why Reboot grew at a rate that substantially exceeded the growth of business overall, so the HTSA membership clearly knows what to do about these issues as witnessed by the amazing growth. I also spoke to one of HTSA’s largest control vendors and they added that they monitor a number of issues regarding security and they reported that they see less than 4% of the professional installations being left “open” to hackers as opposed to the likelihood that in the DIY market that the consumers fail to do basic things like change passwords form admin/admin in over 80% of the installations.

Posted by Julie Jacobson on March 31, 2017

HI, Brian—for sure our industry has made great strides in promoting and providing network security. What we haven’t done as an industry is create business models around it. Bjorn is a long-time friend and we had a lengthy discussion about this subject. He too was challenged by the idea of packaging cybersecurity solutions, since there are so many variations in product types and risk propensities. Someone like Geek Squad is going to start to offer “cyber audits” like they used to do with “energy audits.” I think we should take the lead, or at least be known as the leaders in the category.

Posted by mbaty on March 31, 2017

I think the first step is to stop using “AV networking” equipment like Luxul (yuck). Use real enterprise networking equipment, which typically have everything from malware scanning to built in intrusion prevention and country blocking to name a few.

5 Comments
Posted by mbaty on March 31, 2017

I think the first step is to stop using “AV networking” equipment like Luxul (yuck). Use real enterprise networking equipment, which typically have everything from malware scanning to built in intrusion prevention and country blocking to name a few.

Posted by Julie Jacobson on March 31, 2017

HI, Brian—for sure our industry has made great strides in promoting and providing network security. What we haven’t done as an industry is create business models around it. Bjorn is a long-time friend and we had a lengthy discussion about this subject. He too was challenged by the idea of packaging cybersecurity solutions, since there are so many variations in product types and risk propensities. Someone like Geek Squad is going to start to offer “cyber audits” like they used to do with “energy audits.” I think we should take the lead, or at least be known as the leaders in the category.

Posted by bhudkins on March 31, 2017

Julie,

I’m surprised, regarding cybersecurity, that you concluded that “few (HTSA members) had any ideas how to turn it into an opportunity”. HTSA named Bjorn Jensen of Why Reboot as last year’s man of the year because of the extraordinary support he delivered to many HTSA members. Not only was he the man of the year, Why Reboot grew at a rate that substantially exceeded the growth of business overall, so the HTSA membership clearly knows what to do about these issues as witnessed by the amazing growth. I also spoke to one of HTSA’s largest control vendors and they added that they monitor a number of issues regarding security and they reported that they see less than 4% of the professional installations being left “open” to hackers as opposed to the likelihood that in the DIY market that the consumers fail to do basic things like change passwords form admin/admin in over 80% of the installations.

Posted by Eyal Kattan on March 31, 2017

Home networks, in most homes are wide open for hackers. Opened ports, remote access, cloud control, using DHCP…. All these and more are like backdoor left opened for hackers to grab.

Network security is a constantly-evolving industry of itself and with all do respect to our industry, I doubt it can be simplified in such a way that AV integrators can simply tweak a couple of properties and make the network more secured.

The Home Network needs to be designed, implemented, configured and maintained by network professionals, while the AV is becoming a “client” on the network.

I was recently requested by one of our distributors,  to test the new Luxul series of AV firewalls and was amazed by how limited the settings are compared to the enterprise-level firewalls we’ve been using.

Home networks are as mission-critical as enterprise networks and should be treated this way.

Posted by BryanKoutsky on March 30, 2017

It was a very interesting presentation… left you wanting to know more about how they are doing this, but at the same time, how we can prevent ourselves from being attacked.  Good article Julie, it was good to see you as always.