Control & Automation

CEDIA Find: Olive & Dove’s New Wi-Fi DoorCam Makes You Go ‘Why Didn’t I Think of That?’

Olive & Dove (formerly Remocam) is introducing a Wi-Fi camera at CEDIA 2017 that installs so simply you'll be smacking your forehead for not thinking of it first.

CEDIA Find: Olive & Dove’s New Wi-Fi DoorCam Makes You Go ‘Why Didn’t I Think of That?’
CEDIA 2017: New DoorCam from Olive & Dove (formerly Remocam) hangs over the door with a flat power and communications cable for an easy-to-install Wi-Fi HD-resolution camera.

Julie Jacobson · August 8, 2017

Wi-Fi cameras might be all the rage these days, but they're not so easy to install outdoors, whether in a "smart doorbell" form factor or simply tucked beneath the eaves, where you might have to drill through concrete and suffer from indadequate Wi-Fi coverage.

At CEDIA 2017, Olive & Dove (formerly Remocam) is introducing DoorCam, a new outdoor surveillance camera that installs so simply you might smack your forehead for not thinking of it first.

The product sits atop a door, with the camera facing out; the guts hang on the back side, with the two pieces connected via a thin ribbon for power and communications.

Details about the product have not been revealed -- other than the fact that it dangles over the door and supports HD video -- but we know that O&D's RemoBell video doorbell is powered by AA batteries and features HD video, two-way audio, night vision, PIR sensor and indoor chime. The company has an app and cloud-based recording service.

More CEDIA 2017 New from CE Pro

To our knowledge, neither O&D or its predecessor has ever discussed integration with third-party smart-home products, but the original RemoCam indoor product featured IR blasters for controlling TVs, air conditioners and other IR-controlled devices.

The new DoorCam is not unlike a product we lauded from Echostar back when they had plans to launch the Sage home automation system. That camera could hang out a window, tethered by a flat cable that could be smashed in a window jamb. The cable connected to a Wi-Fi module plugged into an electrical outlet inside (image below).

In 2015 when it introduced (now defunt) plans to launch the Sage home automation system, Echostar demonstrated an outdoor camera with a thin cable that could be squashed in the window jamb.


  About the Author

Julie Jacobson, recipient of the 2014 CEA TechHome Leadership Award, is co-founder of EH Publishing, producer of CE Pro, Electronic House, Commercial Integrator, Security Sales and other leading technology publications. She currently spends most of her time writing for CE Pro in the areas of home automation, security, networked A/V and the business of home systems integration. Julie majored in Economics at the University of Michigan, spent a year abroad at Cambridge University, earned an MBA from the University of Texas at Austin, and has never taken a journalism class in her life. She's a washed-up Ultimate Frisbee player currently residing in Carlsbad, Calif. Email Julie at [email protected]

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  Article Topics


Control & Automation · Automation · Security · Cameras · Events · CEDIA · News · Products · Camera · CEDIA Find · Olive Dove · Remocam · Surveillance · Wi-Fi · All Topics
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Comments

Posted by Mike AViG on August 14, 2017

Technology on the battery powered Wi-Fi front is moving pretty fast.  If designed properly, Wi-Fi devices can be battery powered and have a battery life measured in years.  The device can send an e-mail when the battery needs to be changed, so you never worry about it not working. 
At AViG, we have sensors, keypads, and other Wi-Fi devices that are battery powered (some are AAA and some are 9V) with battery lives that are approaching two years.  It’s all about power management.

Posted by jbrown on August 13, 2017

haha, I can let that slide, Julie. Had that been manufacturer-provided I would be less forgiving.

Posted by Julie Jacobson on August 13, 2017

hahaha, jb. I took some artistic license on the image. Since I’m no good at that stuff, I had to find one that was the right angle, even while completely cognizant that someone with a gorgeous entry like that wouldn’t be putting chunky piece of white plastic on the door. Even so, looks like something that a mfr might showcase, so ... As for the battery. hopefully they have some power-optimizing tech in there somewhere.

Posted by jbrown on August 13, 2017

It’s a neat idea, but battery-powered wi-fi is a bit of an oxymoron. It gets old when you have to change the batteries every few months (or more). And rechargeable AAs are only 1.2volts (instead of 1.5), so they rarely work well in these types of devices.

And then there’s the conundrum that if I owned a house as pretty as the one in the picture, and someone told me they wanted to install a camera like the one in the picture, I would squirt them with a hose while I chased them off my property.

Posted by jbrown on August 13, 2017

It’s a neat idea, but battery-powered wi-fi is a bit of an oxymoron. It gets old when you have to change the batteries every few months (or more). And rechargeable AAs are only 1.2volts (instead of 1.5), so they rarely work well in these types of devices.

And then there’s the conundrum that if I owned a house as pretty as the one in the picture, and someone told me they wanted to install a camera like the one in the picture, I would squirt them with a hose while I chased them off my property.

Posted by Julie Jacobson on August 13, 2017

hahaha, jb. I took some artistic license on the image. Since I’m no good at that stuff, I had to find one that was the right angle, even while completely cognizant that someone with a gorgeous entry like that wouldn’t be putting chunky piece of white plastic on the door. Even so, looks like something that a mfr might showcase, so ... As for the battery. hopefully they have some power-optimizing tech in there somewhere.

Posted by jbrown on August 13, 2017

haha, I can let that slide, Julie. Had that been manufacturer-provided I would be less forgiving.

Posted by Mike AViG on August 14, 2017

Technology on the battery powered Wi-Fi front is moving pretty fast.  If designed properly, Wi-Fi devices can be battery powered and have a battery life measured in years.  The device can send an e-mail when the battery needs to be changed, so you never worry about it not working. 
At AViG, we have sensors, keypads, and other Wi-Fi devices that are battery powered (some are AAA and some are 9V) with battery lives that are approaching two years.  It’s all about power management.